Web-Based Continuing Education: Development, Design and Testing of a Prototype Program in Nursing Ethics

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155773
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Web-Based Continuing Education: Development, Design and Testing of a Prototype Program in Nursing Ethics
Abstract:
Web-Based Continuing Education: Development, Design and Testing of a Prototype Program in Nursing Ethics
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Currier, Sarah, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Creighton University
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the feasibility of a web-based continuing education program on nursing ethics. Design: Two arm randomized trial. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The study was conducted between 10/1/00 and 3/30/01. The target population was RNs needing, or interested in, continuing education regarding ethical issues in clinical practice. A volunteer convenience sample of 180 RNs completed the web-based prototype program during a 23-day period. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): Independent variable: exposure to prototype program. Outcome variable: knowledge scores. Methods: Study activities included (1) development of the prototype program content, (2) design and production of the prototype program, and (3) conduct of a feasibility evaluation of the prototype program. Prototype content: The content was developed based on a review of the literature and the findings of Fry and Riley (1999) that one of the most personally disturbing issues faced by RNs is "prolonging the living/dying process." The advocacy role of the RN was selected as the framework for each program. "Advocacy for Patients Receiving Life-Sustaining Treatments" was developed as the prototype program. The content was drafted by Dr. Fry and reviewed by a panel of four nursing expert consultants. Prototype design and production: Under the direction of the PI (Dr. Tennstedt), the content was developed into a web-based interactive program. Included were video commentary about a case study provided by a professional expert, embedded interactive questions, and hyperlinks to other program sections as well as other related web-sites. Feasibility evaluation: At log-in to the site, RNs were randomized to a control or experimental group. The control group (n=99) completed the feasibility test questions prior to exposure to the course content, and the experimental group (n=81) was exposed to the course content before completing the feasibility test questions. Participants were awarded CE credits for completion of the program and evaluation. Both groups completed the continuing education test questions, a demographics questionnaire, and an overall site and program evaluation after completing the prototype program. Data analysis was performed on the 180 RNs who completed the course and test questions. Analytical procedures included descriptive statistics, t-tests, Chi-square, and Fisher exact tests. Findings: Demographics: Of a total of 260 RNs who accessed the web site, 180 completed the course and the feasibility quiz to comprise the analytical sample. The typical respondent was a Caucasian (94%) female (93%). Respondents were distributed across the US, with 7% from Canada and the UK. Unlike the typical US RN, the majority of respondents had a graduate degree (58%) and were less likely to be practicing in a hospital setting (46%). They had a median of 22 years of nursing experience, and almost all worked full-time. Participants reported encountering ethical issues quite to very frequently (67%) and described their workplace resources as adequate, or less, for handling ethical issues (50%). Consistent with high educational levels, they rated their general knowledge of ethics as high (73%). However, 56% reported the need for continuing education in ethical issues, with 92% expressing strong interest in web-based courses. The vast majority rated the teaching method as effective (87%), and course objectives as met (90%). The infrequent problems with accessing the web site occurred for users of AOL or those with internet connection speeds of 56K or less, which interfered with watching the video commentary. Feasibility evaluation: The objective of the feasibility evaluation was to determine if the prototype program increased knowledge. The test consisted of a case vignette followed by 6 questions. Significantly higher scores were found for the experimental group on 2 of the 6 questions. Conclusions: The study demonstrated the feasibility of the web-based continuing education program in terms of user interest, and program accessibility and usability. The high education level of this convenience sample likely accounts for the limited difference in knowledge scores between the experimental and control groups. Implications: The internet increases access to continuing education programs. Web-based programs offer interactivity lacking in other routes such as home study books or videos. The web-based format also permits timely program updates as new ethical issues emerge.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWeb-Based Continuing Education: Development, Design and Testing of a Prototype Program in Nursing Ethicsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155773-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Web-Based Continuing Education: Development, Design and Testing of a Prototype Program in Nursing Ethics</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Currier, Sarah, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Creighton University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">scurrier@creighton.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop and assess the feasibility of a web-based continuing education program on nursing ethics. Design: Two arm randomized trial. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The study was conducted between 10/1/00 and 3/30/01. The target population was RNs needing, or interested in, continuing education regarding ethical issues in clinical practice. A volunteer convenience sample of 180 RNs completed the web-based prototype program during a 23-day period. Concept or Variables Studied Together or Intervention and Outcome Variable(s): Independent variable: exposure to prototype program. Outcome variable: knowledge scores. Methods: Study activities included (1) development of the prototype program content, (2) design and production of the prototype program, and (3) conduct of a feasibility evaluation of the prototype program. Prototype content: The content was developed based on a review of the literature and the findings of Fry and Riley (1999) that one of the most personally disturbing issues faced by RNs is &quot;prolonging the living/dying process.&quot; The advocacy role of the RN was selected as the framework for each program. &quot;Advocacy for Patients Receiving Life-Sustaining Treatments&quot; was developed as the prototype program. The content was drafted by Dr. Fry and reviewed by a panel of four nursing expert consultants. Prototype design and production: Under the direction of the PI (Dr. Tennstedt), the content was developed into a web-based interactive program. Included were video commentary about a case study provided by a professional expert, embedded interactive questions, and hyperlinks to other program sections as well as other related web-sites. Feasibility evaluation: At log-in to the site, RNs were randomized to a control or experimental group. The control group (n=99) completed the feasibility test questions prior to exposure to the course content, and the experimental group (n=81) was exposed to the course content before completing the feasibility test questions. Participants were awarded CE credits for completion of the program and evaluation. Both groups completed the continuing education test questions, a demographics questionnaire, and an overall site and program evaluation after completing the prototype program. Data analysis was performed on the 180 RNs who completed the course and test questions. Analytical procedures included descriptive statistics, t-tests, Chi-square, and Fisher exact tests. Findings: Demographics: Of a total of 260 RNs who accessed the web site, 180 completed the course and the feasibility quiz to comprise the analytical sample. The typical respondent was a Caucasian (94%) female (93%). Respondents were distributed across the US, with 7% from Canada and the UK. Unlike the typical US RN, the majority of respondents had a graduate degree (58%) and were less likely to be practicing in a hospital setting (46%). They had a median of 22 years of nursing experience, and almost all worked full-time. Participants reported encountering ethical issues quite to very frequently (67%) and described their workplace resources as adequate, or less, for handling ethical issues (50%). Consistent with high educational levels, they rated their general knowledge of ethics as high (73%). However, 56% reported the need for continuing education in ethical issues, with 92% expressing strong interest in web-based courses. The vast majority rated the teaching method as effective (87%), and course objectives as met (90%). The infrequent problems with accessing the web site occurred for users of AOL or those with internet connection speeds of 56K or less, which interfered with watching the video commentary. Feasibility evaluation: The objective of the feasibility evaluation was to determine if the prototype program increased knowledge. The test consisted of a case vignette followed by 6 questions. Significantly higher scores were found for the experimental group on 2 of the 6 questions. Conclusions: The study demonstrated the feasibility of the web-based continuing education program in terms of user interest, and program accessibility and usability. The high education level of this convenience sample likely accounts for the limited difference in knowledge scores between the experimental and control groups. Implications: The internet increases access to continuing education programs. Web-based programs offer interactivity lacking in other routes such as home study books or videos. The web-based format also permits timely program updates as new ethical issues emerge.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:39Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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