2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155774
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Clinical Supervision for Mental Health Nurses: A Longitudinal Study
Abstract:
Clinical Supervision for Mental Health Nurses: A Longitudinal Study
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Stuhlmiller, Cynthia, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Flinders University
Title:Professor
Objective: A peer group clinical supervision initiative was launched in an area health service with an aim to establish a common language and focus for mental health nursing practice, increase recruitment and retention of nurses, increase job satisfaction, decrease burnout, and generate an overall esprit de corpse among nurses. Design: A steering committee lead by the Professor of Mental Health Nursing was formed to generate and guide the clinical supervision policy, training program, continual quality assurance, and evaluation research of the initiative. Senior mental health nurses were trained to facilitate clinical supervision groups. Training included a review of nursing and mental health nursing theory, clinical supervision concepts and research findings, group work theory and practice, and experiential sessions. Groups were established, data was collected pre-initiative and throughout the project, and supervisors received ongoing support and supervision. Population: In 1998, thirty-three senior mental health nurses participated in a five-day peer group clinical supervision training. They subsequently established clinical supervision groups of 5-8 nurses enabling all mental health nurses in South Eastern Sydney Area Health Service (nearly 180) to have fortnightly clinical supervision in their respective clinical settings. Concepts Studied: It was hypothesized that as nurses became engaged in reflection on practice, they would become more equipped to manage the stress and challenge of interpersonal mental health nursing, feel more confident, and experience increased work satisfaction. Methods: Qualitative and quantitative data was collected prior to commencing the initiative and twice subsequently over 18 months using the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale, the Maslach Burnout Scale, the Minnesota Work Satisfaction Scale, the Global Sense of Coherence Scale, and several other standardized health measures. Findings: Overall improvement on most all indices was obtained on the data collected eight months after clinical supervision was initiated. However, the second set of data collected at 18 months post commencement, indicated an overall downward tend or worsening on all indices. Conclusions: These findings are comparable to other international studies. Several factors might explain these results including a change in leadership and work conditions during the initiative. It also may be that as nurses became more engaged in reflection on practice, they became more realistic about their plight thus leading to decreased work satisfaction and more stress. Implications: The purpose and usefulness of clinical supervision should be considered carefully including the approach taken, measures used, and methods used for conducting evaluation research with nurses. In this paper presentation, details of the training components, research strategy, findings, and conclusions will be offered. Discussion and debate will be encouraged.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleClinical Supervision for Mental Health Nurses: A Longitudinal Studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155774-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Clinical Supervision for Mental Health Nurses: A Longitudinal Study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Stuhlmiller, Cynthia, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Flinders University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Cynthia.Stuhlmiller@flinders.e</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: A peer group clinical supervision initiative was launched in an area health service with an aim to establish a common language and focus for mental health nursing practice, increase recruitment and retention of nurses, increase job satisfaction, decrease burnout, and generate an overall esprit de corpse among nurses. Design: A steering committee lead by the Professor of Mental Health Nursing was formed to generate and guide the clinical supervision policy, training program, continual quality assurance, and evaluation research of the initiative. Senior mental health nurses were trained to facilitate clinical supervision groups. Training included a review of nursing and mental health nursing theory, clinical supervision concepts and research findings, group work theory and practice, and experiential sessions. Groups were established, data was collected pre-initiative and throughout the project, and supervisors received ongoing support and supervision. Population: In 1998, thirty-three senior mental health nurses participated in a five-day peer group clinical supervision training. They subsequently established clinical supervision groups of 5-8 nurses enabling all mental health nurses in South Eastern Sydney Area Health Service (nearly 180) to have fortnightly clinical supervision in their respective clinical settings. Concepts Studied: It was hypothesized that as nurses became engaged in reflection on practice, they would become more equipped to manage the stress and challenge of interpersonal mental health nursing, feel more confident, and experience increased work satisfaction. Methods: Qualitative and quantitative data was collected prior to commencing the initiative and twice subsequently over 18 months using the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale, the Maslach Burnout Scale, the Minnesota Work Satisfaction Scale, the Global Sense of Coherence Scale, and several other standardized health measures. Findings: Overall improvement on most all indices was obtained on the data collected eight months after clinical supervision was initiated. However, the second set of data collected at 18 months post commencement, indicated an overall downward tend or worsening on all indices. Conclusions: These findings are comparable to other international studies. Several factors might explain these results including a change in leadership and work conditions during the initiative. It also may be that as nurses became more engaged in reflection on practice, they became more realistic about their plight thus leading to decreased work satisfaction and more stress. Implications: The purpose and usefulness of clinical supervision should be considered carefully including the approach taken, measures used, and methods used for conducting evaluation research with nurses. In this paper presentation, details of the training components, research strategy, findings, and conclusions will be offered. Discussion and debate will be encouraged.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:42Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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