2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155775
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Experience of HIV Testing
Abstract:
Women's Experience of HIV Testing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Ransom, Jane, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: The overall purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experience of women seeking HIV testing. The factors that influenced their choices to seek HIV testing, the experience of waiting for results, and the experience of the testing process were explored. Design: A naturalistic method was employed, using a phenomenological approach. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population of interest was non-pregnant adult women. Currently, pregnant women are primarily targeted for HIV testing because of the value of treatment in preventing vertical transmission to the fetus and infant. However, less focus is devoted to women at other times in their lives. Therefore, adult women over 18 not currently pregnant who had not been tested before and who had recently sought HIV testing and counseling were asked to participate in this study. A purposeful sampling method was used to guide the selection of study participants. Informants were recruited from persons attending an anonymous HIV testing and counseling center located in an outpatient clinic associated with a large urban tertiary care hospital in Northwest Ohio. Consent forms were reviewed with each participant, but no signatures were requested to protect the women's anonymity. Women were offered a $10 gift certificate in appreciation of their time. Fifteen interviews were completed over a three month period with women ranging in age from 23 to 46 years of age, primarily Caucasian. Methods: Data were collected in individual face-to-face in-depth interviews, audiotaped for later data analysis. Transcriptions of the interviews were read independently by the research team and interpretations of the data have been compared and consensually validated. Thematic analysis was conducted through phenomenological reflection. Findings: Data analysis is in process, with several themes emerging. Factors influencing women's seeking of HIV testing varied, and women sometimes required extensive periods of time before they were ready to face getting test results. Part of their identification of a location for testing was seeking a site that was easily accessible and protected their identities. Waiting for results was identified as very stressful. The researchers have identified a pervasive process that women have described going through as they describe the experience of HIV testing. The stages of this process have been labeled: 1) deciding, 2) choosing, 3) testing process, 4) anticipating and waiting, and 5) moving on. Conclusions: These women's experience of HIV testing has been influenced by both internal and external factors. There seems to be an identifiable process that many describe going through, with some pervasive themes that continue to be identified. Implications: This study has implications for increasing providers' understanding about the barriers to seeking testing and how the experience impacts women's perceptions and decisions. Providers are challenged to provide accessible testing that protects women's confidentiality in conjunction with sensitive discussion of women's concerns.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Experience of HIV Testingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155775-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Experience of HIV Testing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Ransom, Jane, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jransom@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The overall purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the experience of women seeking HIV testing. The factors that influenced their choices to seek HIV testing, the experience of waiting for results, and the experience of the testing process were explored. Design: A naturalistic method was employed, using a phenomenological approach. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The population of interest was non-pregnant adult women. Currently, pregnant women are primarily targeted for HIV testing because of the value of treatment in preventing vertical transmission to the fetus and infant. However, less focus is devoted to women at other times in their lives. Therefore, adult women over 18 not currently pregnant who had not been tested before and who had recently sought HIV testing and counseling were asked to participate in this study. A purposeful sampling method was used to guide the selection of study participants. Informants were recruited from persons attending an anonymous HIV testing and counseling center located in an outpatient clinic associated with a large urban tertiary care hospital in Northwest Ohio. Consent forms were reviewed with each participant, but no signatures were requested to protect the women's anonymity. Women were offered a $10 gift certificate in appreciation of their time. Fifteen interviews were completed over a three month period with women ranging in age from 23 to 46 years of age, primarily Caucasian. Methods: Data were collected in individual face-to-face in-depth interviews, audiotaped for later data analysis. Transcriptions of the interviews were read independently by the research team and interpretations of the data have been compared and consensually validated. Thematic analysis was conducted through phenomenological reflection. Findings: Data analysis is in process, with several themes emerging. Factors influencing women's seeking of HIV testing varied, and women sometimes required extensive periods of time before they were ready to face getting test results. Part of their identification of a location for testing was seeking a site that was easily accessible and protected their identities. Waiting for results was identified as very stressful. The researchers have identified a pervasive process that women have described going through as they describe the experience of HIV testing. The stages of this process have been labeled: 1) deciding, 2) choosing, 3) testing process, 4) anticipating and waiting, and 5) moving on. Conclusions: These women's experience of HIV testing has been influenced by both internal and external factors. There seems to be an identifiable process that many describe going through, with some pervasive themes that continue to be identified. Implications: This study has implications for increasing providers' understanding about the barriers to seeking testing and how the experience impacts women's perceptions and decisions. Providers are challenged to provide accessible testing that protects women's confidentiality in conjunction with sensitive discussion of women's concerns.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:45Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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