2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155779
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recovery of Older Adults after Major Abdominal Surgery Following
Abstract:
Recovery of Older Adults after Major Abdominal Surgery Following
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Zalon, Margarete
P.I. Institution Name:University of Scranton
Title:Professor
Objective: The objective of this research was to determine whether pain, fatigue and depression were factors in the recovery of older adults after major abdominal surgery. Design: This was a correlational predictive design. Sample: The sample consisted of 141 patients who had major abdominal surgery at one of three community hospitals. between 1997 and 2000. Patients were recruited post-operatively while in the hospital. Patients had to be alert and oriented and able to understand the consent. Patients who had surgery for a malignancy were excluded from the study. Concepts: The proportion of older adults in the population is increasing. Little is known about correlates of recovery in older adults who have had major abdominal surgery. On the other hand, concerted efforts are being made to reduce health care costs through earlier discharge from the hospital. Older adults who are hospitalized or have physical illness are at increase risk for depression. The literature suggests that pain, fatigue and depression may be significant in recovery from major surgery, but their precise role needs to be established in order for nurses to institute appropriate cost-effective interventions. Recovery from surgery is defined as a restoration of integrity in the context of Levine's Conservation Model (1991). within this model, pain, and depression are conceptualized as depleting energy and impairing integrity, and fatigue is a manifestation of depleted energy. Methods: Data were collected by telephone interviews at three-to-five days, one month and three months following discharge to the community. Pain, depression, fatigue and functional status were measured with The Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, Modified Fatigue Symptom Checklist and the Enforced Social Dependency Scale respectively. Findings: Multiple regression analysis indicated that pain, depression and fatigue were significantly related to patients' functional status. Pain, depression and fatigue explained 13.4% of the variation in functional status at three to five days, 30.8% of the variation at one month and 29.1% of the variation at three months. Conclusions: These results suggest that pain, depression and fatigue are important factors to consider in providing postoperative care for abdominal surgery patients. Implications: The implications are that nurses should institute interventions address pain, depression and fatigue in the postoperative period. Research should be conducted on the specific nature of such interventions in order maximize their effectiveness for patients aged 60 years and older as they recover from surgery.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecovery of Older Adults after Major Abdominal Surgery Followingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155779-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recovery of Older Adults after Major Abdominal Surgery Following</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zalon, Margarete</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Scranton</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">zalonm1@scranton.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of this research was to determine whether pain, fatigue and depression were factors in the recovery of older adults after major abdominal surgery. Design: This was a correlational predictive design. Sample: The sample consisted of 141 patients who had major abdominal surgery at one of three community hospitals. between 1997 and 2000. Patients were recruited post-operatively while in the hospital. Patients had to be alert and oriented and able to understand the consent. Patients who had surgery for a malignancy were excluded from the study. Concepts: The proportion of older adults in the population is increasing. Little is known about correlates of recovery in older adults who have had major abdominal surgery. On the other hand, concerted efforts are being made to reduce health care costs through earlier discharge from the hospital. Older adults who are hospitalized or have physical illness are at increase risk for depression. The literature suggests that pain, fatigue and depression may be significant in recovery from major surgery, but their precise role needs to be established in order for nurses to institute appropriate cost-effective interventions. Recovery from surgery is defined as a restoration of integrity in the context of Levine's Conservation Model (1991). within this model, pain, and depression are conceptualized as depleting energy and impairing integrity, and fatigue is a manifestation of depleted energy. Methods: Data were collected by telephone interviews at three-to-five days, one month and three months following discharge to the community. Pain, depression, fatigue and functional status were measured with The Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form, Geriatric Depression Scale-Short Form, Modified Fatigue Symptom Checklist and the Enforced Social Dependency Scale respectively. Findings: Multiple regression analysis indicated that pain, depression and fatigue were significantly related to patients' functional status. Pain, depression and fatigue explained 13.4% of the variation in functional status at three to five days, 30.8% of the variation at one month and 29.1% of the variation at three months. Conclusions: These results suggest that pain, depression and fatigue are important factors to consider in providing postoperative care for abdominal surgery patients. Implications: The implications are that nurses should institute interventions address pain, depression and fatigue in the postoperative period. Research should be conducted on the specific nature of such interventions in order maximize their effectiveness for patients aged 60 years and older as they recover from surgery.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:09:58Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:09:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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