2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155781
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Making a Difference: The ANCC Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program
Abstract:
Making a Difference: The ANCC Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Monarch, Kammie
P.I. Institution Name:American Nurses Credentialing Center
Title:Director
Today, recruiting and retaining registered nurses is one of the primary challenges facing many health care organizations around the world. Sign-on bonuses, longevity pay, and other approaches historically used to recruit and retain registered nurses have proven to be short-term strategies that have had little or no long-term impact on an employer's ability to recruit and retain registered nurses. Hence, the recruitment and retention conundrum continues for staff nurses, nurse administrators, and health care administrators. A few health care organizations have opted to forgo exploring and implementing short-term strategies. Instead, this small, but growing group of pioneering organizations are now focused on improving the work environment so that nurses and other members of the health care team can practice in settings that foster and promote excellence in the delivery of patient care services. How have these excellence-focused organizations succeeded in transforming their work places? They have implemented the standards associated with the Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program (Magnet Program). The Magnet Program is a division of the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), and recognizes excellence in the delivery of patient care services. Since Magnet status was initially awarded in 1994 to the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, interest in the program has been growing. Interest in the Magnet Program is expressed by individuals, organizational representatives, the media, and policymakers in every state in the United States, and in at least one country in each continent around the world. In fact, 2001 was the first year in which the Magnet Program received "intent to apply" notices from health care organizations abroad. Regardless of the setting or the geographical location of individual inquiring about the Magnet Program, their questions usually include: "What are the foundational underpinnings for the Magnet Program?" "Upon what research is the Magnet Program based?" "What makes this program so unique?" "How does one go about applying for Magnet status?" "Can the program be applied outside the inpatient setting:" What was done to improve the Magnet Program's applicability to international settings?" "Is there evidence available that indicates that care in Magnet facilities really is better?" And, "What research-based outcomes are positively correlated to Magnet status?" This presentation will explore the answers to these and other frequently asked questions about ANCC's Magnet Nursing Service Recognition Program. In addition, some of the characteristics shared by Magnet organizations will be outlined, and trends associated with the Magnet Program will be shared. Participants will also have an opportunity to work through Magnet Program Standards in a small group setting, so that expectations associated with Program Standards can be clarified.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMaking a Difference: The ANCC Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155781-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Making a Difference: The ANCC Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Monarch, Kammie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">American Nurses Credentialing Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Director</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kmonarch@ana.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Today, recruiting and retaining registered nurses is one of the primary challenges facing many health care organizations around the world. Sign-on bonuses, longevity pay, and other approaches historically used to recruit and retain registered nurses have proven to be short-term strategies that have had little or no long-term impact on an employer's ability to recruit and retain registered nurses. Hence, the recruitment and retention conundrum continues for staff nurses, nurse administrators, and health care administrators. A few health care organizations have opted to forgo exploring and implementing short-term strategies. Instead, this small, but growing group of pioneering organizations are now focused on improving the work environment so that nurses and other members of the health care team can practice in settings that foster and promote excellence in the delivery of patient care services. How have these excellence-focused organizations succeeded in transforming their work places? They have implemented the standards associated with the Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program (Magnet Program). The Magnet Program is a division of the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), and recognizes excellence in the delivery of patient care services. Since Magnet status was initially awarded in 1994 to the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle, Washington, interest in the program has been growing. Interest in the Magnet Program is expressed by individuals, organizational representatives, the media, and policymakers in every state in the United States, and in at least one country in each continent around the world. In fact, 2001 was the first year in which the Magnet Program received &quot;intent to apply&quot; notices from health care organizations abroad. Regardless of the setting or the geographical location of individual inquiring about the Magnet Program, their questions usually include: &quot;What are the foundational underpinnings for the Magnet Program?&quot; &quot;Upon what research is the Magnet Program based?&quot; &quot;What makes this program so unique?&quot; &quot;How does one go about applying for Magnet status?&quot; &quot;Can the program be applied outside the inpatient setting:&quot; What was done to improve the Magnet Program's applicability to international settings?&quot; &quot;Is there evidence available that indicates that care in Magnet facilities really is better?&quot; And, &quot;What research-based outcomes are positively correlated to Magnet status?&quot; This presentation will explore the answers to these and other frequently asked questions about ANCC's Magnet Nursing Service Recognition Program. In addition, some of the characteristics shared by Magnet organizations will be outlined, and trends associated with the Magnet Program will be shared. Participants will also have an opportunity to work through Magnet Program Standards in a small group setting, so that expectations associated with Program Standards can be clarified.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:10:05Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:10:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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