Coping Strategies for Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease-Related Dietary Behavior Barriers among Older Latinas

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155783
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coping Strategies for Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease-Related Dietary Behavior Barriers among Older Latinas
Abstract:
Coping Strategies for Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease-Related Dietary Behavior Barriers among Older Latinas
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Juarbe, Teresa
P.I. Institution Name:University of California-San Francisco
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: Latina women (LW) have a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile that compares unfavorably with that of white women on diabetes, obesity and physical activity (PA). Physical activity and saturated fat/cholesterol avoidance behaviors are the most significant modifiable risk factors for Latinas. However, LW often confronts a socio-cultural disempowering environment when they attempt to engage in health behaviors such as PA and CVD-related diet. The aim of this presentation is to report on the specific emotion and problem focused strategies LW use when confronted with situations that hampered their ability to engage on regular PA or CVD-related diet. Design: Using a cross-sectional, descriptive design, self-reported data was collected on the coping strategies women used to deal with PA and CVD-related dietary behavior barriers. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants are part of cohort study that is exploring CVD risk factors behaviors in a non-probability sample of 223 LW living in Northern California. Seventy-nine Mexican and 144 Central American women ages 40 to 75 (59, ±9). Most of the participants were monolingual, low income and low acculturated Latinas with less than 8 years of education. Sixty-three percent (140) have access to health care through Medical HMOs (40, 29%), private HMO (36, 26%), and Medicare (11, 8%), This group of women was found to be disproportionately affected by multiple risk factors for CVD, including overweight (64, 29%) and obesity (110, 49%). Concepts/Variables Studied: A social feminist perspective and Nyamathi's Comprehensive Health Seeking and Coping Paradigm (1996) was used as the theoretical framework. Caspersen and colleagues (1985) definition of PA and exercise and the American Heart Association definitions for CVD-related dietary behaviors were used. Coping strategies were defined according to the work of Lazarus and Folkman (1984). Methods: Women diagnosed with a risk factor for CVD, such as hypertension, diabetes, and elevated serum cholesterol, were recruited from primary care clinics and community-based organizations. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in the language preferred by respondents (Spanish/English) with an interview packet that included bio-behavioral, psychosocial, and sociodemographic variables, and CVD-related physiological measures. The section on coping strategies asked women to think about the constraints they perceived in their experiences with PA and CVD-related diet behaviors. They were then asked to describe how stressful was this challenge and how they appraised the situation. Coping strategies were listed and categorized as problem- or emotion-focused behaviors. Findings: Women were more likely to describe problem-focused (changing strategies, setting goals, seeking support) rather than emotion-focused strategies (praying, having faith) as a response to these situations. The majority of these strategies were developed in response to social and cultural roles and physical health. In appraising these situations women found limited resources to achieve health behavior goals. Several coping strategies such as multiple dietary approaches, denial, acceptance, have negative consequences to the physical and psychosocial health of women. Conclusions: Collaborating with LW to change these complex health behaviors require a multidimensional approach that considers resources, socio-cultural issues, personal factors, cognitive appraisal, and the health behavioral goal of each individual woman. Implications: The findings suggest that nursing interventions for lifestyle changes for Latinas with risk factors for CVD may require long-term cognitive-behavioral approaches with a focus in the context of culture and family.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCoping Strategies for Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease-Related Dietary Behavior Barriers among Older Latinasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155783-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Coping Strategies for Physical Activity and Cardiovascular Disease-Related Dietary Behavior Barriers among Older Latinas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Juarbe, Teresa</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of California-San Francisco</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">teresa.juarbe@nursing.ucsf.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Latina women (LW) have a cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile that compares unfavorably with that of white women on diabetes, obesity and physical activity (PA). Physical activity and saturated fat/cholesterol avoidance behaviors are the most significant modifiable risk factors for Latinas. However, LW often confronts a socio-cultural disempowering environment when they attempt to engage in health behaviors such as PA and CVD-related diet. The aim of this presentation is to report on the specific emotion and problem focused strategies LW use when confronted with situations that hampered their ability to engage on regular PA or CVD-related diet. Design: Using a cross-sectional, descriptive design, self-reported data was collected on the coping strategies women used to deal with PA and CVD-related dietary behavior barriers. Population, Sample, Setting, Years: The participants are part of cohort study that is exploring CVD risk factors behaviors in a non-probability sample of 223 LW living in Northern California. Seventy-nine Mexican and 144 Central American women ages 40 to 75 (59, &plusmn;9). Most of the participants were monolingual, low income and low acculturated Latinas with less than 8 years of education. Sixty-three percent (140) have access to health care through Medical HMOs (40, 29%), private HMO (36, 26%), and Medicare (11, 8%), This group of women was found to be disproportionately affected by multiple risk factors for CVD, including overweight (64, 29%) and obesity (110, 49%). Concepts/Variables Studied: A social feminist perspective and Nyamathi's Comprehensive Health Seeking and Coping Paradigm (1996) was used as the theoretical framework. Caspersen and colleagues (1985) definition of PA and exercise and the American Heart Association definitions for CVD-related dietary behaviors were used. Coping strategies were defined according to the work of Lazarus and Folkman (1984). Methods: Women diagnosed with a risk factor for CVD, such as hypertension, diabetes, and elevated serum cholesterol, were recruited from primary care clinics and community-based organizations. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in the language preferred by respondents (Spanish/English) with an interview packet that included bio-behavioral, psychosocial, and sociodemographic variables, and CVD-related physiological measures. The section on coping strategies asked women to think about the constraints they perceived in their experiences with PA and CVD-related diet behaviors. They were then asked to describe how stressful was this challenge and how they appraised the situation. Coping strategies were listed and categorized as problem- or emotion-focused behaviors. Findings: Women were more likely to describe problem-focused (changing strategies, setting goals, seeking support) rather than emotion-focused strategies (praying, having faith) as a response to these situations. The majority of these strategies were developed in response to social and cultural roles and physical health. In appraising these situations women found limited resources to achieve health behavior goals. Several coping strategies such as multiple dietary approaches, denial, acceptance, have negative consequences to the physical and psychosocial health of women. Conclusions: Collaborating with LW to change these complex health behaviors require a multidimensional approach that considers resources, socio-cultural issues, personal factors, cognitive appraisal, and the health behavioral goal of each individual woman. Implications: The findings suggest that nursing interventions for lifestyle changes for Latinas with risk factors for CVD may require long-term cognitive-behavioral approaches with a focus in the context of culture and family.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:10:12Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:10:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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