Towards Better Practice: A Collaborative Approach to Managing Type 2 Diabetes in Australian Indigenous People

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155784
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Towards Better Practice: A Collaborative Approach to Managing Type 2 Diabetes in Australian Indigenous People
Abstract:
Towards Better Practice: A Collaborative Approach to Managing Type 2 Diabetes in Australian Indigenous People
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Oliver, Mary
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Australia
Title:Senior Lecturer
Non Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) in Indigenous peoples of Australia is classified as one of the most pressing and significant health problems in contemporary society and the Australian government along with other agencies have recognised NIDDM in Aborigines as a health priority requiring action (Colagiuri, Colagiuri, & Ward, 1998); (Thompson & Briscoe, 1991); (Nutbeam, Thomas, & Wise, 1993);(Commission, 1994). This is because the incidence of diabetes in Aborigines and in particular NIDDM or type 2 diabetes far exceeds those of all other Australians. Considering that in 1996 the total Australian Indigenous population was estimated at 418,800 of a total population of 18 million (Statistics, 1998), this presents a major concern to governments, health professionals as well as to those in the community. By and large NIDDM as a disorder can be controlled and managed through collaboration with individuals who are required to make lifestyle changes in order to control this disorder. Simplistic as this may sound, such an approach has not yielded results in Indigenous people and they continue to experience the highest morbidity and mortality rates from this disorder. Therefore, a different approach is called for if we are to put in place a better management protocol for NIDDM in Indigenous people, who require a commitment to partnership; sensitivity to their unique needs and culturally appropriate strategies that will enable individuals to embrace the necessary lifestyle changes. This is an achievable goal, given that it has been proved that the conventional strategies used for managing NIDDM have had little impact on preventing complications related to NIDDM in Aboriginal people. Adopting a socio-cultural approach over the bio-medical approach provides for a holistic approach for managing contemporary health issues in Indigenous peoples including diabetes which was mooted over a decade ago, and emphasised by Puggy Hunter (1999), and yet, little progress is evident in this area. More recently, the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs called for a holistic approach in managing health needs of Indigenous people and echoed this call by stating that "...health needs of Aborigines should be considered on a holistic basis, and not broken down into body part type programs" (House of Representatives Standing Committee, 2000). It is imperative to take heed of this advice. To this end, we entered into a partnership with the people of Goondir Health Service in Dalby Queensland, a community controlled primary healthcare service with 10,000 Aborigines. Over a six-month period, we worked closely with this community in exploring the importance of traditional beliefs and health practices of Indigenous people related to NIDDM. The information gained from this pilot program has a direct impact on future programs to be provided for this group of people. The potential important discovery we have made lies in the integration of this information in the day-to-day management of diabetes by Indigenous people. The findings of this research stands to bring about a greater degree of acceptance for managing the disorder from the Indigenous community, thereby making a highly significant contribution to improving the health status of people with NIDDM in the Goondir Aboriginal Health Service community and beyond. The findings from our pilot study will be discussed in this presentation.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTowards Better Practice: A Collaborative Approach to Managing Type 2 Diabetes in Australian Indigenous Peopleen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155784-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Towards Better Practice: A Collaborative Approach to Managing Type 2 Diabetes in Australian Indigenous People</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Oliver, Mary</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Australia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Senior Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mary.oliver@unisa.edu.au</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Non Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM) in Indigenous peoples of Australia is classified as one of the most pressing and significant health problems in contemporary society and the Australian government along with other agencies have recognised NIDDM in Aborigines as a health priority requiring action (Colagiuri, Colagiuri, &amp; Ward, 1998); (Thompson &amp; Briscoe, 1991); (Nutbeam, Thomas, &amp; Wise, 1993);(Commission, 1994). This is because the incidence of diabetes in Aborigines and in particular NIDDM or type 2 diabetes far exceeds those of all other Australians. Considering that in 1996 the total Australian Indigenous population was estimated at 418,800 of a total population of 18 million (Statistics, 1998), this presents a major concern to governments, health professionals as well as to those in the community. By and large NIDDM as a disorder can be controlled and managed through collaboration with individuals who are required to make lifestyle changes in order to control this disorder. Simplistic as this may sound, such an approach has not yielded results in Indigenous people and they continue to experience the highest morbidity and mortality rates from this disorder. Therefore, a different approach is called for if we are to put in place a better management protocol for NIDDM in Indigenous people, who require a commitment to partnership; sensitivity to their unique needs and culturally appropriate strategies that will enable individuals to embrace the necessary lifestyle changes. This is an achievable goal, given that it has been proved that the conventional strategies used for managing NIDDM have had little impact on preventing complications related to NIDDM in Aboriginal people. Adopting a socio-cultural approach over the bio-medical approach provides for a holistic approach for managing contemporary health issues in Indigenous peoples including diabetes which was mooted over a decade ago, and emphasised by Puggy Hunter (1999), and yet, little progress is evident in this area. More recently, the House of Representatives Standing Committee on Family and Community Affairs called for a holistic approach in managing health needs of Indigenous people and echoed this call by stating that &quot;...health needs of Aborigines should be considered on a holistic basis, and not broken down into body part type programs&quot; (House of Representatives Standing Committee, 2000). It is imperative to take heed of this advice. To this end, we entered into a partnership with the people of Goondir Health Service in Dalby Queensland, a community controlled primary healthcare service with 10,000 Aborigines. Over a six-month period, we worked closely with this community in exploring the importance of traditional beliefs and health practices of Indigenous people related to NIDDM. The information gained from this pilot program has a direct impact on future programs to be provided for this group of people. The potential important discovery we have made lies in the integration of this information in the day-to-day management of diabetes by Indigenous people. The findings of this research stands to bring about a greater degree of acceptance for managing the disorder from the Indigenous community, thereby making a highly significant contribution to improving the health status of people with NIDDM in the Goondir Aboriginal Health Service community and beyond. The findings from our pilot study will be discussed in this presentation.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:10:15Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:10:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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