2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155786
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing a Culturally Sensitive HIV Risk Reduction Intervention in Latinas
Abstract:
Developing a Culturally Sensitive HIV Risk Reduction Intervention in Latinas
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Peragallo, Nilda
P.I. Institution Name:University of Maryland
Title:Associate Professor
Objective: The objective of the study was to develop a HIV Risk Reduction Intervention program for low-income Latino Women who live in Chicago, IL. Design: This study was performed in two phases: community focus groups and a randomized intervention trial. Focus groups were conducted to understand the issues involved in HIV risk from lifestyles and behaviors of low-income Latino women. The focus group information was used to develop a culturally sensitive HIV Risk Reduction Intervention program called SEPA: Salud/Health, Educación/Education, Prevención/Prevention, Autocuidado/Self-Care). Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A sample of 657 low-income Latino women, between the ages of 18 and 44, from Chicago, IL were recruited to participate in a randomized trial of SEPA program. Variables studied Together or Intervention and Outcomes: The interview instrument used for the study includes demographic information, acculturation, psychological status measures, self-esteem, sexual risk and behaviors for the three months previous to the interview, knowledge of HIV/AIDS, information on substance abuse and violence experiences. Methods: Focus Groups: Low-income Latino women were recruited from the community. Six focus groups were conducted with 30 women participating. A content analysis was performed on the transcripts. Intervention: Women were randomized into either the intervention or control group. Both groups were interviewed at baseline, 6-week or immediate post-intervention, 3-month and 6-month post intervention. Trained bilingual research assistants administered the interviews. The intervention consisted of 6 two-hour weekly sessions. The content of these sessions is: 1) HIV awareness in the community and knowing your body (male and female anatomy and physiology); 2) Understanding sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS; 3) Use of male and female condoms and other barrier methods; 4) Communication and negotiation skills; 5) Prevention and management of domestic violence; 6) Participant's presentations of content learned. Findings: The focus group themes that emerged were lack of communication between partners, lack of knowledge and misconceptions about HIV/AIDS, partner/domestic violence, gender roles (machismo and marianismo) and community problems. These issues were incorporated into a 6-session HIV risk reduction intervention program (SEPA). The SEPA Intervention baseline data indicates that there was a low use of condoms during sex (63% never used a condom), that women were primarily monogamous (5% had multiple partners), many had significant depressive symptoms (CESD=20 SD=13), 19% reported some violence in their relationship with their partners, and most derived their HIV risk through their partners (85%). Conclusions: Latino women of childbearing age in Chicago have high HIV infection rates, primarily through heterosexual sex. Yet they lack knowledge of their partners' risk behaviors and HIV status, and their condom use is low. They also report high levels of violence on the part of their current partners. Relationship violence is associated with primary HIV risk factors and psychological well-being and may hinder efforts to reduce the risk factors. HIV interventions for this group of women must address their level of relationship violence if these interventions are to be effective Implications: Specific areas to be addressed are: 1) Recruitment and retention plans, 2) Issues related to instrumentation, scales, language, cultural values and sensitivity, and how these impact the training process, 3) Field experiences identifying barriers encountered while recruiting, interviewing, and retaining study panels, 4) Lessons learned from the field, 5) Legal and ethical issues in working with Latinos.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping a Culturally Sensitive HIV Risk Reduction Intervention in Latinasen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155786-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developing a Culturally Sensitive HIV Risk Reduction Intervention in Latinas</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peragallo, Nilda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Maryland</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">peragallo@son.umaryland.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: The objective of the study was to develop a HIV Risk Reduction Intervention program for low-income Latino Women who live in Chicago, IL. Design: This study was performed in two phases: community focus groups and a randomized intervention trial. Focus groups were conducted to understand the issues involved in HIV risk from lifestyles and behaviors of low-income Latino women. The focus group information was used to develop a culturally sensitive HIV Risk Reduction Intervention program called SEPA: Salud/Health, Educaci&oacute;n/Education, Prevenci&oacute;n/Prevention, Autocuidado/Self-Care). Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A sample of 657 low-income Latino women, between the ages of 18 and 44, from Chicago, IL were recruited to participate in a randomized trial of SEPA program. Variables studied Together or Intervention and Outcomes: The interview instrument used for the study includes demographic information, acculturation, psychological status measures, self-esteem, sexual risk and behaviors for the three months previous to the interview, knowledge of HIV/AIDS, information on substance abuse and violence experiences. Methods: Focus Groups: Low-income Latino women were recruited from the community. Six focus groups were conducted with 30 women participating. A content analysis was performed on the transcripts. Intervention: Women were randomized into either the intervention or control group. Both groups were interviewed at baseline, 6-week or immediate post-intervention, 3-month and 6-month post intervention. Trained bilingual research assistants administered the interviews. The intervention consisted of 6 two-hour weekly sessions. The content of these sessions is: 1) HIV awareness in the community and knowing your body (male and female anatomy and physiology); 2) Understanding sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS; 3) Use of male and female condoms and other barrier methods; 4) Communication and negotiation skills; 5) Prevention and management of domestic violence; 6) Participant's presentations of content learned. Findings: The focus group themes that emerged were lack of communication between partners, lack of knowledge and misconceptions about HIV/AIDS, partner/domestic violence, gender roles (machismo and marianismo) and community problems. These issues were incorporated into a 6-session HIV risk reduction intervention program (SEPA). The SEPA Intervention baseline data indicates that there was a low use of condoms during sex (63% never used a condom), that women were primarily monogamous (5% had multiple partners), many had significant depressive symptoms (CESD=20 SD=13), 19% reported some violence in their relationship with their partners, and most derived their HIV risk through their partners (85%). Conclusions: Latino women of childbearing age in Chicago have high HIV infection rates, primarily through heterosexual sex. Yet they lack knowledge of their partners' risk behaviors and HIV status, and their condom use is low. They also report high levels of violence on the part of their current partners. Relationship violence is associated with primary HIV risk factors and psychological well-being and may hinder efforts to reduce the risk factors. HIV interventions for this group of women must address their level of relationship violence if these interventions are to be effective Implications: Specific areas to be addressed are: 1) Recruitment and retention plans, 2) Issues related to instrumentation, scales, language, cultural values and sensitivity, and how these impact the training process, 3) Field experiences identifying barriers encountered while recruiting, interviewing, and retaining study panels, 4) Lessons learned from the field, 5) Legal and ethical issues in working with Latinos.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:10:22Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:10:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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