Medical Factors and Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer in Unmarried Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155787
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medical Factors and Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer in Unmarried Women
Abstract:
Medical Factors and Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer in Unmarried Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Budin, Wendy, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Seton Hall University
Title:Associate Professor
Problem/Objective: Breast cancer is a significant health problem among women. Although breast cancer is often diagnosed early, permitting options for less disfiguring surgery than in the past and follow-up treatment which allows for better control of side effects, the psychosocial impact of breast cancer is still profound. These women often journey through a maze of treatment alternatives with a wide array of physical, emotional, interpersonal and social implications. Although there is growing evidence that women with supportive husbands seem to adjust reasonably well, little is known about the impact of breast cancer among unmarried women. Design/Variables: In this secondary analysis of a larger study, the relations among selected medical factors, including stage of disease, primary treatment alternative, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, symptom distress, and psychosocial adjustment to breast cancer in unmarried women were investigated. It was hypothesized that stressors associated with primary treatment alternatives and variability in appraisal of the stressful nature of breast cancer treatments, conceptualized as symptom distress would account for a significant proportion of the variance in psychosocial adjustment to breast Methods: Data were collected from 101 unmarried women (single, divorced/separated or widowed) during the late post-operative recovery phase through means of a mail survey. Participants completed a questionnaire which included (a) The Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer Factor Score (Murphy, 1993) of the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS) (Derogatis, 1983); (b) The Symptom Distress Scale (SDS) (McCorkle & Young, 1978); and (c) a Demographic and Medical Information Form. Findings/Conclusions: The unmarried women in this sample experienced relatively low levels of psychosocial adjustment problems during the late post operative recovery phase. Regression analysis and commonality procedures indicated that symptom distress accounted for significant proportions of the variance in psychosocial adjustment, whereas primary treatment alternatives did not. Analysis of Variance indicated no significant differences in symptom distress or psychosocial adjustment in women receiving radiation as compared to those who were not or those with reconstruction compared to those without. Those receiving chemotherapy as compared to those who were not and those with more advanced disease had significantly higher scores on the Symptom Distress Scale and on the Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer Scale (indicating more problems). Implications for health care providers to facilitate positive adjustment to breast cancer in unmarried women and directions for future studies are suggested.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedical Factors and Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer in Unmarried Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155787-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Medical Factors and Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer in Unmarried Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Budin, Wendy, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Seton Hall University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">budinwen@shu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Problem/Objective: Breast cancer is a significant health problem among women. Although breast cancer is often diagnosed early, permitting options for less disfiguring surgery than in the past and follow-up treatment which allows for better control of side effects, the psychosocial impact of breast cancer is still profound. These women often journey through a maze of treatment alternatives with a wide array of physical, emotional, interpersonal and social implications. Although there is growing evidence that women with supportive husbands seem to adjust reasonably well, little is known about the impact of breast cancer among unmarried women. Design/Variables: In this secondary analysis of a larger study, the relations among selected medical factors, including stage of disease, primary treatment alternative, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, symptom distress, and psychosocial adjustment to breast cancer in unmarried women were investigated. It was hypothesized that stressors associated with primary treatment alternatives and variability in appraisal of the stressful nature of breast cancer treatments, conceptualized as symptom distress would account for a significant proportion of the variance in psychosocial adjustment to breast Methods: Data were collected from 101 unmarried women (single, divorced/separated or widowed) during the late post-operative recovery phase through means of a mail survey. Participants completed a questionnaire which included (a) The Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer Factor Score (Murphy, 1993) of the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale (PAIS) (Derogatis, 1983); (b) The Symptom Distress Scale (SDS) (McCorkle &amp; Young, 1978); and (c) a Demographic and Medical Information Form. Findings/Conclusions: The unmarried women in this sample experienced relatively low levels of psychosocial adjustment problems during the late post operative recovery phase. Regression analysis and commonality procedures indicated that symptom distress accounted for significant proportions of the variance in psychosocial adjustment, whereas primary treatment alternatives did not. Analysis of Variance indicated no significant differences in symptom distress or psychosocial adjustment in women receiving radiation as compared to those who were not or those with reconstruction compared to those without. Those receiving chemotherapy as compared to those who were not and those with more advanced disease had significantly higher scores on the Symptom Distress Scale and on the Psychosocial Adjustment to Breast Cancer Scale (indicating more problems). Implications for health care providers to facilitate positive adjustment to breast cancer in unmarried women and directions for future studies are suggested.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:10:26Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:10:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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