A Meta-Analysis of Effects of Relaxation Therapy on Anxiety, Blood Pressure, and Pulse Rate

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155793
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Meta-Analysis of Effects of Relaxation Therapy on Anxiety, Blood Pressure, and Pulse Rate
Abstract:
A Meta-Analysis of Effects of Relaxation Therapy on Anxiety, Blood Pressure, and Pulse Rate
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Kim, Hee-Seung
P.I. Institution Name:Catholic University
Objective: To quantitatively compare different types of relaxation therapy, including progressive relaxation, relaxation response and differences in the duration of relaxation therapy among Koreans in Korea. Design: Meta-anlysis. First is the problem statement, followed by identification and collection of all available sources of potentially relevant data, then an evaluation of each report, and finally, the interpretation of the summary of statistical analysis (Bailar, 1999). Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A systematic search for published full reports of quasi-experimental studies published between 1980 and 1994 in Korean was conducted. In Korea major data sources are theses, dissertation, and institutional journals. Therefore, an atypical literature search was conducted including the index of theses and dissertation of the National Assembly of Universities, National University Library Home Page, and the Index of Nursing Master Theses and Doctoral Dissertation (Kou, et al., 1996). Professional nursing networking and contacts with all nursing institutions were the most valuable sources to obtain data. Main outcomes measures were: 1) anxiety measured by Spielberg Anxiety scale, 2) blood pressure, and 3) pulse rate. Method (Data analysis): We estimated effect size and standard error of each outcome variables in each study. For each outcome variable that was studied, we determined whether the results were positive (indicating that relaxation therapy resulted in a better outcome) or negative (indicating that relaxation therapy resulted in an equal or worse outcome) at the conventional level of statistical significance (p <.05). Effect size was calculated with the formula, M (control) - M (treatment) / SD (pooled), as described by Song (1998). Findings: Among 14 studies, three used Jacobson's progressive relaxation therapy, five used modified Jacobson's progressive relaxation, two used Benson's relaxation method , two used Goldfired and Division's Letting go relaxation method and two used Budzynski' relaxation method. Relaxation training was administered in 2 to 21 treatment sessions. The effect size of state anxiety was a minimum of 0.133 to a maximum of 2.29 and its mean effect size was d=0.89(SE=0.078). The mean effect size of systolic BP was d=0.72 (SE=0.10) and diastolic BP was d=0.80 (SE=0.11). The Jacobson relaxation group showed significantly less reduction in the anxiety state (X2=7.1, p <.01) but significantly greater reduction in both systolic BP (X2=7.4, p<0.01) and diastolic BP (X2=13.37, p<.0.001). The duration of the therapy (60 minutes is cutting point) had no effect on state of anxiety but the group who received therapy for more than 60 minutes significantly decreased their systolic pressure (d=0.28 vs. d=1.0) and diastolic pressure (d=0.40 vs. d=1.11). Conclusion and Implication: Our findings indicate that relaxation therapy has significant positive effects on both state anxiety and blood pressure regardless the types of relaxation therapies. Jacobson relaxation therapy is more effective on physiological responses of blood pressure control but is less effective on state anxiety compared with other relaxation therapies. However, given the small number of the studies in this meta-analysis, it would be premature to draw conclusions regarding what types of therapies are more effective. The data suggest, however, that more than 60 minutes of therapy can enhance relaxation effects on anxiety and BP.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Meta-Analysis of Effects of Relaxation Therapy on Anxiety, Blood Pressure, and Pulse Rateen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155793-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Meta-Analysis of Effects of Relaxation Therapy on Anxiety, Blood Pressure, and Pulse Rate</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kim, Hee-Seung</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Catholic University</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hees1014@hanmail.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To quantitatively compare different types of relaxation therapy, including progressive relaxation, relaxation response and differences in the duration of relaxation therapy among Koreans in Korea. Design: Meta-anlysis. First is the problem statement, followed by identification and collection of all available sources of potentially relevant data, then an evaluation of each report, and finally, the interpretation of the summary of statistical analysis (Bailar, 1999). Population, Sample, Setting, Years: A systematic search for published full reports of quasi-experimental studies published between 1980 and 1994 in Korean was conducted. In Korea major data sources are theses, dissertation, and institutional journals. Therefore, an atypical literature search was conducted including the index of theses and dissertation of the National Assembly of Universities, National University Library Home Page, and the Index of Nursing Master Theses and Doctoral Dissertation (Kou, et al., 1996). Professional nursing networking and contacts with all nursing institutions were the most valuable sources to obtain data. Main outcomes measures were: 1) anxiety measured by Spielberg Anxiety scale, 2) blood pressure, and 3) pulse rate. Method (Data analysis): We estimated effect size and standard error of each outcome variables in each study. For each outcome variable that was studied, we determined whether the results were positive (indicating that relaxation therapy resulted in a better outcome) or negative (indicating that relaxation therapy resulted in an equal or worse outcome) at the conventional level of statistical significance (p &lt;.05). Effect size was calculated with the formula, M (control) - M (treatment) / SD (pooled), as described by Song (1998). Findings: Among 14 studies, three used Jacobson's progressive relaxation therapy, five used modified Jacobson's progressive relaxation, two used Benson's relaxation method , two used Goldfired and Division's Letting go relaxation method and two used Budzynski' relaxation method. Relaxation training was administered in 2 to 21 treatment sessions. The effect size of state anxiety was a minimum of 0.133 to a maximum of 2.29 and its mean effect size was d=0.89(SE=0.078). The mean effect size of systolic BP was d=0.72 (SE=0.10) and diastolic BP was d=0.80 (SE=0.11). The Jacobson relaxation group showed significantly less reduction in the anxiety state (X2=7.1, p &lt;.01) but significantly greater reduction in both systolic BP (X2=7.4, p&lt;0.01) and diastolic BP (X2=13.37, p&lt;.0.001). The duration of the therapy (60 minutes is cutting point) had no effect on state of anxiety but the group who received therapy for more than 60 minutes significantly decreased their systolic pressure (d=0.28 vs. d=1.0) and diastolic pressure (d=0.40 vs. d=1.11). Conclusion and Implication: Our findings indicate that relaxation therapy has significant positive effects on both state anxiety and blood pressure regardless the types of relaxation therapies. Jacobson relaxation therapy is more effective on physiological responses of blood pressure control but is less effective on state anxiety compared with other relaxation therapies. However, given the small number of the studies in this meta-analysis, it would be premature to draw conclusions regarding what types of therapies are more effective. The data suggest, however, that more than 60 minutes of therapy can enhance relaxation effects on anxiety and BP.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:10:46Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:10:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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