Factors that Contribute to a Health System's Successful Retention of Registered Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155796
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors that Contribute to a Health System's Successful Retention of Registered Nurses
Abstract:
Factors that Contribute to a Health System's Successful Retention of Registered Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2002
Conference Date:July, 2002
Author:Parsons, Mickey, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
Title:Associate Professor
OBJECTIVE: To learn about factors that support successful retention of staff nurses. DESIGN: The goal of the nursing hospital system is to become a health promoting organization consistent with a social ecological framework, which gives recognition to the interplay between environmental and personal factors in health problems and solutions. Health is synonymous with well being from a holistic perspective - mind, body, and spirit. Therefore, the study design is qualitative to provide a beginning foundation for future interventions. POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING, YEARS: The sample was n=31 staff nurses who work in a large multi-hospital community faith-based system. The mean age was 44 years and the mean total years of nursing experience were 17.2 years. The average years of experience at the hospital system were 8.7 years. Most were Caucasian (87%), followed by Hispanic (6.5%) and Asian (6.5%). The majority are married (68%) and the average number of children was 1.4. Educationally, 39% of the nurses had a baccalaureate degree, and 39% had associate degree preparation. The setting is in a large southwestern city in the United States and the data was collected in November and December 2000. CONCEPT OR VARIABLES STUDIED TOGETHER: Variables studied include the following: what attracted the staff nurse to the hospital system and what was important then and any differences now; nurses' views of patient care on their units; nurses' views of how the system supported them to be successful nurses; and nurses perspectives on how long they saw themselves continuing to be employed by the hospital system, and other considerations that enhanced their longevity in the system. METHODS: Six (6) focus groups were conducted with one focus group in each service line: Critical Care, Peri-operative, Medical-Surgical, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, and Emergency Services. Twenty staff nurses were randomly selected and recruited for each of the six service lines by years of service, 1 year or less, 1- 3 years, and over 3 years, with the goal of obtaining 12 participants who voluntarily agreed to participate in a focus group for their clinical area. Semi-structured and open-ended questions were utilized in the focus groups, which were audiotaped and transcribed. The data was analyzed utilizing narrative analysis. FINDINGS: The dominant themes and sub-themes that emerged are as follows: pay - for retention, not only bonus pay for recruitment; staffing - appropriate to the clinical setting, having a realistic charge nurse role, and time for precepting new nurses; developing and maintaining positive relationships with physicians; having nurse manager support and advocacy; having positive relationships on their unit; being invited to participate in problem solving/decision making; having an administration that listens and responds and a visible upper management and administration. CONCLUSIONS: Although a multitude of factors are necessary for retention of staff nurses, the predominant factors are enhanced pay for retention, appropriate staffing, and positive relationships - with physicians, their manager, and among the unit staff. IMPLICATIONS: The nursing shortage has again become recognized as a local, national and international problem. Given the challenges in today's competitive marketplace it is imperative to develop and test organizational interventions that support professional practice, healthy work environments, and quality leadership to promote nursing staff retention.

Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
Jul-2002
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors that Contribute to a Health System's Successful Retention of Registered Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155796-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors that Contribute to a Health System's Successful Retention of Registered Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July, 2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Parsons, Mickey, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">parsonsm@uthscsa.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">OBJECTIVE: To learn about factors that support successful retention of staff nurses. DESIGN: The goal of the nursing hospital system is to become a health promoting organization consistent with a social ecological framework, which gives recognition to the interplay between environmental and personal factors in health problems and solutions. Health is synonymous with well being from a holistic perspective - mind, body, and spirit. Therefore, the study design is qualitative to provide a beginning foundation for future interventions. POPULATION, SAMPLE, SETTING, YEARS: The sample was n=31 staff nurses who work in a large multi-hospital community faith-based system. The mean age was 44 years and the mean total years of nursing experience were 17.2 years. The average years of experience at the hospital system were 8.7 years. Most were Caucasian (87%), followed by Hispanic (6.5%) and Asian (6.5%). The majority are married (68%) and the average number of children was 1.4. Educationally, 39% of the nurses had a baccalaureate degree, and 39% had associate degree preparation. The setting is in a large southwestern city in the United States and the data was collected in November and December 2000. CONCEPT OR VARIABLES STUDIED TOGETHER: Variables studied include the following: what attracted the staff nurse to the hospital system and what was important then and any differences now; nurses' views of patient care on their units; nurses' views of how the system supported them to be successful nurses; and nurses perspectives on how long they saw themselves continuing to be employed by the hospital system, and other considerations that enhanced their longevity in the system. METHODS: Six (6) focus groups were conducted with one focus group in each service line: Critical Care, Peri-operative, Medical-Surgical, Obstetrics, Pediatrics, and Emergency Services. Twenty staff nurses were randomly selected and recruited for each of the six service lines by years of service, 1 year or less, 1- 3 years, and over 3 years, with the goal of obtaining 12 participants who voluntarily agreed to participate in a focus group for their clinical area. Semi-structured and open-ended questions were utilized in the focus groups, which were audiotaped and transcribed. The data was analyzed utilizing narrative analysis. FINDINGS: The dominant themes and sub-themes that emerged are as follows: pay - for retention, not only bonus pay for recruitment; staffing - appropriate to the clinical setting, having a realistic charge nurse role, and time for precepting new nurses; developing and maintaining positive relationships with physicians; having nurse manager support and advocacy; having positive relationships on their unit; being invited to participate in problem solving/decision making; having an administration that listens and responds and a visible upper management and administration. CONCLUSIONS: Although a multitude of factors are necessary for retention of staff nurses, the predominant factors are enhanced pay for retention, appropriate staffing, and positive relationships - with physicians, their manager, and among the unit staff. IMPLICATIONS: The nursing shortage has again become recognized as a local, national and international problem. Given the challenges in today's competitive marketplace it is imperative to develop and test organizational interventions that support professional practice, healthy work environments, and quality leadership to promote nursing staff retention.<br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:10:56Z-
dc.date.issued2002-07en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:10:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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