Qualitative Analysis of Spirituality Research in the Health Science: Conceptual Issues

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155804
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Qualitative Analysis of Spirituality Research in the Health Science: Conceptual Issues
Abstract:
Qualitative Analysis of Spirituality Research in the Health Science: Conceptual Issues
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2003
Conference Date:July 10-12, 2003
Author:Chiu, Lyren, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of British Columbia
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Julia Emblen, Lynn Van Hofwegen, Rick Sawatzky, Heather Meyerhoff
Spirituality is a universal human phenomenon, yet confusion and incomprehension of the concept is ever-present. Objective: The objectives of the study are to 1) identify the essential elements in a definition of spirituality which has been reported in the health literature in 1990-2000; 2) investigate currently used theoretical frameworks/conceptual models in spirituality research; and 3) examine the concept of spirituality from a transcultural and historical perspectives. Methods: The examination was based on a qualitative integrative review approach. Sample: The sample included 73 spirituality research articles, which were published in English between January 1990 through September 2000. An electronic data-collection tool was designed for use in this project, and formatted using Excel software for transfer of coded data into the NVivo software for the comparative qualitative data analysis and interpretation. Findings: The results identified essential elements of spirituality, current use of operational definitions and instruments, conceptual frameworks used in spirituality research, and cultural aspects of spirituality. Historical comparison among decades and barriers in researching spirituality are also discussed. Conclusions: Spirituality, while not precisely defined, was conceptualized by concepts of: existential; connectedness with Self, Others, Nature, and Higher Being; transcendence; and force/power/energy. The thematic analysis of operational definitions accorded with the results of the conceptual definitions, including existential, relational, transcendent, subjective, and expressive. Cross-cultural examination of the concept of spirituality demonstrated cultural commonality and particularity. Comparing words used to describe spirituality in 1991 with those used in 2000, fewer religiously related terms and stronger focus on personal aspects were found. Implications: Spirituality is an essential element of nursing practice. The investigation of spirituality will have an increased importance for nursing. A better understanding of this concept will help ensure the delivery of high quality health care to all clients.<P> <P> <!--Abstract 13264 modified by 137.82.169.31 on 10-31-2002--></P></P>
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
10-Jul-2003
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleQualitative Analysis of Spirituality Research in the Health Science: Conceptual Issuesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155804-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Qualitative Analysis of Spirituality Research in the Health Science: Conceptual Issues</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2003</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 10-12, 2003</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chiu, Lyren, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of British Columbia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chiu@nursing.ubc.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julia Emblen, Lynn Van Hofwegen, Rick Sawatzky, Heather Meyerhoff</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Spirituality is a universal human phenomenon, yet confusion and incomprehension of the concept is ever-present. Objective: The objectives of the study are to 1) identify the essential elements in a definition of spirituality which has been reported in the health literature in 1990-2000; 2) investigate currently used theoretical frameworks/conceptual models in spirituality research; and 3) examine the concept of spirituality from a transcultural and historical perspectives. Methods: The examination was based on a qualitative integrative review approach. Sample: The sample included 73 spirituality research articles, which were published in English between January 1990 through September 2000. An electronic data-collection tool was designed for use in this project, and formatted using Excel software for transfer of coded data into the NVivo software for the comparative qualitative data analysis and interpretation. Findings: The results identified essential elements of spirituality, current use of operational definitions and instruments, conceptual frameworks used in spirituality research, and cultural aspects of spirituality. Historical comparison among decades and barriers in researching spirituality are also discussed. Conclusions: Spirituality, while not precisely defined, was conceptualized by concepts of: existential; connectedness with Self, Others, Nature, and Higher Being; transcendence; and force/power/energy. The thematic analysis of operational definitions accorded with the results of the conceptual definitions, including existential, relational, transcendent, subjective, and expressive. Cross-cultural examination of the concept of spirituality demonstrated cultural commonality and particularity. Comparing words used to describe spirituality in 1991 with those used in 2000, fewer religiously related terms and stronger focus on personal aspects were found. Implications: Spirituality is an essential element of nursing practice. The investigation of spirituality will have an increased importance for nursing. A better understanding of this concept will help ensure the delivery of high quality health care to all clients.&lt;P&gt; &lt;P&gt; &lt;!--Abstract 13264 modified by 137.82.169.31 on 10-31-2002--&gt;&lt;/P&gt;&lt;/P&gt;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:11:22Z-
dc.date.issued2003-07-10en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:11:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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