Illness Representation After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Impact on In-Hospital Recovery

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155826
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Illness Representation After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Impact on In-Hospital Recovery
Abstract:
Illness Representation After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Impact on In-Hospital Recovery
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Cherrington, Candace C., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State Univeristy
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Debra K. Moser, DNSc, RN; Terry A. Lennie, PhD, RN; Carol W. Kennedy, PhD, RN
Objective: To determine the impact of illness representation during myocardial infarction (MI) physiologic and psychologic recovery. Design: predictive correlational Sample, Setting, Years: Subjects (n = 49, age 61±13 years; 49% male) had confirmed MI. Data were collected in a CCU of a Midwestern academic medical center from 2-12, 2000. Concepts and Variables Studied: Illness representation, depression, anxiety, heart rate variability (HRV), salivary cortisol and complications Method: All data were within 24-48 hours of admission. Data on illness representation, depression and anxiety were collected using the Illness Perception Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and Spielberger State Anxiety Index respectively. Beat-to-beat heart rate data were collected from a 1 hour Holter recording and assessed for time and frequency domain measures of HRV. Salivary cortisol was assessed by immunoassay. Complications were assessed by chart review. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to analyze data. Findings: There was a relationship between illness representation and depression (adjusted R2=.409, p=.001) and anxiety (adjusted R2=.42, p=.001) while controlling for sociodemographics, health history and ejection fraction. Holding all independent variables constant, for each one unit increase in illness representation score the odds of having a complication increased 8.3% (p=.018). Illness representation was not related to HRV or salivary cortisol. Conclusions: Persons with a negative representation of having suffered MI are more likely to be depressed or anxious and to experience a complication during hospitalization. Implications: This study reinforces the need for nurses to be aware of the meaning and significance of illness to persons recovering from MI.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIllness Representation After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Impact on In-Hospital Recoveryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155826-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Illness Representation After Acute Myocardial Infarction: Impact on In-Hospital Recovery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Cherrington, Candace C., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State Univeristy</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">candace.cherrington@wright.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Debra K. Moser, DNSc, RN; Terry A. Lennie, PhD, RN; Carol W. Kennedy, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To determine the impact of illness representation during myocardial infarction (MI) physiologic and psychologic recovery. Design: predictive correlational Sample, Setting, Years: Subjects (n = 49, age 61&plusmn;13 years; 49% male) had confirmed MI. Data were collected in a CCU of a Midwestern academic medical center from 2-12, 2000. Concepts and Variables Studied: Illness representation, depression, anxiety, heart rate variability (HRV), salivary cortisol and complications Method: All data were within 24-48 hours of admission. Data on illness representation, depression and anxiety were collected using the Illness Perception Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, and Spielberger State Anxiety Index respectively. Beat-to-beat heart rate data were collected from a 1 hour Holter recording and assessed for time and frequency domain measures of HRV. Salivary cortisol was assessed by immunoassay. Complications were assessed by chart review. Hierarchical multiple regression was used to analyze data. Findings: There was a relationship between illness representation and depression (adjusted R2=.409, p=.001) and anxiety (adjusted R2=.42, p=.001) while controlling for sociodemographics, health history and ejection fraction. Holding all independent variables constant, for each one unit increase in illness representation score the odds of having a complication increased 8.3% (p=.018). Illness representation was not related to HRV or salivary cortisol. Conclusions: Persons with a negative representation of having suffered MI are more likely to be depressed or anxious and to experience a complication during hospitalization. Implications: This study reinforces the need for nurses to be aware of the meaning and significance of illness to persons recovering from MI.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:12:40Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:12:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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