Relationship Among Patient Characteristics and Vascular Complications Post-Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155827
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relationship Among Patient Characteristics and Vascular Complications Post-Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Abstract:
Relationship Among Patient Characteristics and Vascular Complications Post-Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Chlan, Linda L., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Julie A. Sabo, RN, MN, CCRN, CS; Kay Savik, MS
Objective: Vascular complications (VC) following femoral sheath removal after a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be distressful for patients and increase intensity of nursing care. VC rates are 9-30% depending on many patient characteristics. However, which characteristics contribute to VC is inconsistent among studies. The purpose of this study was to determine which patient characteristics were related to VC post-PCI. Design: Descriptive, correlational Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 249 patients undergoing PCI were recruited from one heart hospital in the urban Midwest, U.S.A. from 6/3/02-12/10/03. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Patient characteristics (age, gender, hypertension, body surface area [BSA], angina, diabetes) and incidence of vascular complications (ecchymosis, hematoma, oozing, pulsatile mass) were assessed. Methods: Patients were recruited prior to PCI in the cardiovascular laboratory. After PCI, patients were transferred to the nursing unit wherein assessment for presence of VC commenced. Nurses assessed the groin area prior to, immediately, 12-, and 24 hours after femoral sheath removal. Descriptive statistics and correlational analyses were used. Findings: Patients' mean age was 61.9 (+/- 11.4) with 79% male, 21% female, 93% Caucasian and 7% minority representation. VC occurrence was ecchymosis (34%), hematoma (18%), oozing (11%), and pulsatile mass (0.4%). Age was significantly correlated with ecchymosis (r = .15; p = .01); hematoma with BSA (r = -.18; p = .004) and; oozing with angina (X2 = 6.04; p = .01). Conclusions: Ecchymosis was the most common VC in this patient sample and was associated with older age. Lower BSA was related to hematoma, and angina history to oozing. Implications: Older, smaller PCI patients with angina may require extra vigilance and tailoring of nursing care to prevent VC. This study exemplifies how the patient care community (nursing staff, clinical nurse specialist, nurse researcher, physicians and patients) at one hospital collaborated to assess and ultimately improve patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelationship Among Patient Characteristics and Vascular Complications Post-Percutaneous Coronary Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155827-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relationship Among Patient Characteristics and Vascular Complications Post-Percutaneous Coronary Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chlan, Linda L., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chlan001@umn.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Julie A. Sabo, RN, MN, CCRN, CS; Kay Savik, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: Vascular complications (VC) following femoral sheath removal after a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can be distressful for patients and increase intensity of nursing care. VC rates are 9-30% depending on many patient characteristics. However, which characteristics contribute to VC is inconsistent among studies. The purpose of this study was to determine which patient characteristics were related to VC post-PCI. Design: Descriptive, correlational Population, Sample, Setting, Years: 249 patients undergoing PCI were recruited from one heart hospital in the urban Midwest, U.S.A. from 6/3/02-12/10/03. Intervention and Outcome Variables: Patient characteristics (age, gender, hypertension, body surface area [BSA], angina, diabetes) and incidence of vascular complications (ecchymosis, hematoma, oozing, pulsatile mass) were assessed. Methods: Patients were recruited prior to PCI in the cardiovascular laboratory. After PCI, patients were transferred to the nursing unit wherein assessment for presence of VC commenced. Nurses assessed the groin area prior to, immediately, 12-, and 24 hours after femoral sheath removal. Descriptive statistics and correlational analyses were used. Findings: Patients' mean age was 61.9 (+/- 11.4) with 79% male, 21% female, 93% Caucasian and 7% minority representation. VC occurrence was ecchymosis (34%), hematoma (18%), oozing (11%), and pulsatile mass (0.4%). Age was significantly correlated with ecchymosis (r = .15; p = .01); hematoma with BSA (r = -.18; p = .004) and; oozing with angina (X2 = 6.04; p = .01). Conclusions: Ecchymosis was the most common VC in this patient sample and was associated with older age. Lower BSA was related to hematoma, and angina history to oozing. Implications: Older, smaller PCI patients with angina may require extra vigilance and tailoring of nursing care to prevent VC. This study exemplifies how the patient care community (nursing staff, clinical nurse specialist, nurse researcher, physicians and patients) at one hospital collaborated to assess and ultimately improve patient outcomes.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:12:43Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:12:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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