2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155828
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Reproductive Health Education on Contraceptive Knowledge
Abstract:
The Effects of Reproductive Health Education on Contraceptive Knowledge
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Chung-Park, Min S., MSN, RN, WHNP
P.I. Institution Name:Naval Medical Center San Diego and Student at the University of San Diego
Title:Nursing Doctoral Candidate and Women's Health Nurse Practitioner
Objective: To evaluate the effect of the repeated, pregnancy prevention program on contraceptive knowledge, contraceptive use, and contraceptive behavior over time among sexually active females. Design: A quasi-experimental design with repeated measures was used to test the hypotheses that over time an experimental group will have: 1) increased contraceptive knowledge, 2) increased contraceptive use, and 3) positive changes on contraceptive behavior. Population, sample, setting: Thirty-five active duty Navy enlisted women were recruited from the Guam area from 2001-2002. Outcome variable: To evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention; increased contraceptive use, the Stages of Change Model was used as the theoretical framework. Methods: The experimental group received a two-hour intervention, followed by one-hour refresher training at six and 12 months; the control group received no intervention. Descriptive, contingency tables using chi square, and one-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to analyze data Findings: There were measurable differences in learning and retention of contraceptive knowledge over time between the two groups (p<0.001) suggesting that repetitive interventions are markedly effective in the increase and retention of contraceptive knowledge. However, no statistically significant differences on changes in their contraceptive use practices or stage of change for contraceptive use were noted between the groups over time. The knowledge was not a statistically significant predictor of increased contraceptive use. Conclusions: All participants demonstrated moderate deficits in reproductive knowledge but knowledge was acquired with intervention in the experimental group. Knowledge obtained from a single intervention, however, was not retained for a prolonged period. Instead, repetitive measures over time were more effective in knowledge building and retention. Knowledge had no correlation with contraceptive use practices or intention. Implications: Further longitudinal, repetitive intervention studies using larger sample size is needed. However, the findings suggest women at risk for unintended pregnancy need education and counseling regarding family planning issues.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Reproductive Health Education on Contraceptive Knowledgeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155828-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Reproductive Health Education on Contraceptive Knowledge</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chung-Park, Min S., MSN, RN, WHNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Naval Medical Center San Diego and Student at the University of San Diego</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nursing Doctoral Candidate and Women's Health Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mschungpark@nmcsd.med.navy.mil</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To evaluate the effect of the repeated, pregnancy prevention program on contraceptive knowledge, contraceptive use, and contraceptive behavior over time among sexually active females. Design: A quasi-experimental design with repeated measures was used to test the hypotheses that over time an experimental group will have: 1) increased contraceptive knowledge, 2) increased contraceptive use, and 3) positive changes on contraceptive behavior. Population, sample, setting: Thirty-five active duty Navy enlisted women were recruited from the Guam area from 2001-2002. Outcome variable: To evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention; increased contraceptive use, the Stages of Change Model was used as the theoretical framework. Methods: The experimental group received a two-hour intervention, followed by one-hour refresher training at six and 12 months; the control group received no intervention. Descriptive, contingency tables using chi square, and one-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to analyze data Findings: There were measurable differences in learning and retention of contraceptive knowledge over time between the two groups (p&lt;0.001) suggesting that repetitive interventions are markedly effective in the increase and retention of contraceptive knowledge. However, no statistically significant differences on changes in their contraceptive use practices or stage of change for contraceptive use were noted between the groups over time. The knowledge was not a statistically significant predictor of increased contraceptive use. Conclusions: All participants demonstrated moderate deficits in reproductive knowledge but knowledge was acquired with intervention in the experimental group. Knowledge obtained from a single intervention, however, was not retained for a prolonged period. Instead, repetitive measures over time were more effective in knowledge building and retention. Knowledge had no correlation with contraceptive use practices or intention. Implications: Further longitudinal, repetitive intervention studies using larger sample size is needed. However, the findings suggest women at risk for unintended pregnancy need education and counseling regarding family planning issues.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:12:47Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:12:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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