2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155830
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Birth Plan Decision-Making Between Nurse-Midwives and Clients
Abstract:
Birth Plan Decision-Making Between Nurse-Midwives and Clients
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Doherty, Mary Ellen, PhD, RN, CNM
P.I. Institution Name:University of Massachusetts-Lowell
Title:Assistant Professor
Objective: To describe participation in decision-making between nurse-midwives and clients regarding the development of a birth plan. Design: Qualitative, a field study. Population, Sample, Setting, Year: Pregnant women receiving nurse-midwifery care for the first time; eight certified nurse-midwives and twenty prenatal clients; Northeastern USA; 2000 Concept Studied: The decision-making process Methods: Purposive sample; modified participant-observation and audiotaping of prenatal visits; post visit telephone interviews with each client and nurse-midwife separately. Content analysis was used to analyze the transcriptions and fieldnotes. Findings: Three distinct patterns of interaction emerged from the data. The "pattern of directives" was characterized by the nurse-midwives taking a pro-active stance for clients to complete birth plans. In the "pattern of emergence" a birth plan was in a state of evolving and focused on clarifying and resolving issues. The "pattern of validation" involved the review of completed birth plans with attention to their viability. More than half of the clients participating in the study had developed a birth plan prior to 36 weeks gestation. Conclusions: A birth plan is an important communication document which involves anticipatory work, reflection, and decision-making about the conduct of normal labor and birth. Nurse-midwives are in a strategic position to help clients in this endeavor. The findings of this study have not only generated knowledge about client-provider communication and decision-making in a prenatal setting but also suggest applicability across the entire spectrum of healthcare. Implications: Research of this nature benefits both the recipients of care and the providers of that care. The manner in which nurses approach a birth plan with clients has important implications for clinical practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBirth Plan Decision-Making Between Nurse-Midwives and Clientsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155830-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Birth Plan Decision-Making Between Nurse-Midwives and Clients</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Doherty, Mary Ellen, PhD, RN, CNM</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Massachusetts-Lowell</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">MEDPHD6@aol.com</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: To describe participation in decision-making between nurse-midwives and clients regarding the development of a birth plan. Design: Qualitative, a field study. Population, Sample, Setting, Year: Pregnant women receiving nurse-midwifery care for the first time; eight certified nurse-midwives and twenty prenatal clients; Northeastern USA; 2000 Concept Studied: The decision-making process Methods: Purposive sample; modified participant-observation and audiotaping of prenatal visits; post visit telephone interviews with each client and nurse-midwife separately. Content analysis was used to analyze the transcriptions and fieldnotes. Findings: Three distinct patterns of interaction emerged from the data. The &quot;pattern of directives&quot; was characterized by the nurse-midwives taking a pro-active stance for clients to complete birth plans. In the &quot;pattern of emergence&quot; a birth plan was in a state of evolving and focused on clarifying and resolving issues. The &quot;pattern of validation&quot; involved the review of completed birth plans with attention to their viability. More than half of the clients participating in the study had developed a birth plan prior to 36 weeks gestation. Conclusions: A birth plan is an important communication document which involves anticipatory work, reflection, and decision-making about the conduct of normal labor and birth. Nurse-midwives are in a strategic position to help clients in this endeavor. The findings of this study have not only generated knowledge about client-provider communication and decision-making in a prenatal setting but also suggest applicability across the entire spectrum of healthcare. Implications: Research of this nature benefits both the recipients of care and the providers of that care. The manner in which nurses approach a birth plan with clients has important implications for clinical practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:12:54Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:12:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.