2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155836
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Colorectal Cancer Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors in African-Americans
Abstract:
Colorectal Cancer Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors in African-Americans
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2004
Conference Date:July 22-24, 2004
Author:Green, Pauline M., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Howard University
Title:Acting Chairmam Umdergraduate Program, Howard University Divsion of Nursing
Co-Authors:Beatrice V. Adderley-Kelly, RN, PhD
Objectives: To (1)determine Colorectal cancer (CRC)knowlege, perceptions about CRC threat, barriers to screenng, and screening behaviors of African Americans 50 years and above; (2) determine factors influencing African Americans perceptions about CRC threat and screening;(3) determine the difference in CRC knowledge, perceptions about CRC threat, barriers to screening and screening behaviors between men and women in this population. Design: Descriptive Survey. Sample: A convenience sample of 100 African American men and women age 50 and above. Variables: Colorectal Cancer knowledge, perceptions about CRC threat, benefits, barriers, CRC screening behaviors. Methods: The Colorectal Cancer Knowledge, Perceptions and Screening Survey was used for data collection. The instrument was a three-part survey adapted from scales in the literature. Part one consisted of demographic, sociopsychological, and structural information. Part two consisted of three sections: the CRC Knowledge Test, which consisted of 16 true/false items; the CRC Perception Scale, which consisted of 35 items; and the CRC Screening Behavior Report, which consisted of six items. The reliabilty of the entire instrument was alpha = .84. Follwing permission to conduct the study from IRB, subjects were recruited to participate. The survey took approximately 30 minutes. Descriptive and inferential statistic were used for data analysis. Findings: Participants demonstrated inadequate CRC knowledge with a signicant difference in mean scores between males and females. Self report of participation in screening was above the national average. A high percentage perceived numerous benefits to CRC screening. Predictor variables found in the Health Belief Model accounted for a significant amount of variance in screening behavior, barriers, and threat. Conclusions: Older African Americans need more information about CRC in order to increase their awareness of CRC and the importance of screening. Implications: There is a need to educate health care professionals about CRC causes, prevention, detection and the importance of screening.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
22-Jul-2004
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleColorectal Cancer Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors in African-Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155836-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Colorectal Cancer Knowledge, Perceptions, and Behaviors in African-Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2004</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">July 22-24, 2004</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Green, Pauline M., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Howard University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Acting Chairmam Umdergraduate Program, Howard University Divsion of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pgreen@howard.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Beatrice V. Adderley-Kelly, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objectives: To (1)determine Colorectal cancer (CRC)knowlege, perceptions about CRC threat, barriers to screenng, and screening behaviors of African Americans 50 years and above; (2) determine factors influencing African Americans perceptions about CRC threat and screening;(3) determine the difference in CRC knowledge, perceptions about CRC threat, barriers to screening and screening behaviors between men and women in this population. Design: Descriptive Survey. Sample: A convenience sample of 100 African American men and women age 50 and above. Variables: Colorectal Cancer knowledge, perceptions about CRC threat, benefits, barriers, CRC screening behaviors. Methods: The Colorectal Cancer Knowledge, Perceptions and Screening Survey was used for data collection. The instrument was a three-part survey adapted from scales in the literature. Part one consisted of demographic, sociopsychological, and structural information. Part two consisted of three sections: the CRC Knowledge Test, which consisted of 16 true/false items; the CRC Perception Scale, which consisted of 35 items; and the CRC Screening Behavior Report, which consisted of six items. The reliabilty of the entire instrument was alpha = .84. Follwing permission to conduct the study from IRB, subjects were recruited to participate. The survey took approximately 30 minutes. Descriptive and inferential statistic were used for data analysis. Findings: Participants demonstrated inadequate CRC knowledge with a signicant difference in mean scores between males and females. Self report of participation in screening was above the national average. A high percentage perceived numerous benefits to CRC screening. Predictor variables found in the Health Belief Model accounted for a significant amount of variance in screening behavior, barriers, and threat. Conclusions: Older African Americans need more information about CRC in order to increase their awareness of CRC and the importance of screening. Implications: There is a need to educate health care professionals about CRC causes, prevention, detection and the importance of screening.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:13:14Z-
dc.date.issued2004-07-22en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:13:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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