A Five-Year Comparison of the Prevalence of Low-Income Preschooler Overweight and Obesity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155906
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Five-Year Comparison of the Prevalence of Low-Income Preschooler Overweight and Obesity
Abstract:
A Five-Year Comparison of the Prevalence of Low-Income Preschooler Overweight and Obesity
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Harbaugh, Bonnie Lee, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Mississippi
Title:Associate Professor, Asbury Research Professor
Co-Authors:Jerome R. Kolbo PhD, ACSW, Professor
Elaine F. Molaison PhD, RD, Associate Professor
Lei Zhang PhD, MPH, Director of Health Data and Research
[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose: This longitudinal prevalence study compares 2005 and 2010 overweight/obesity trends in representative samples of low-income Head Start preschoolers. Significance: Child obesity is a significant global nursing issue because of its' negative health consequences. Framework: Child obesity is of concern to nurses due to the risk of early onset of obesity-related illnesses and the potential longevity of lifetime exposure to those illnesses. Approximately 21% of Mississippi Head Start (low-income) preschoolers are obese, compared to 14% for USA low-income preschoolers, and have many risk factors including obese family members, poverty, and low breastfeeding rates. Weight trend analyses are necessary for disease surveillance and health policy evaluation.
Methods: Chi-Square analyses were used to compare the 2005 (N=1250) and 2010 (N=1765) Body Mass Indexes of Mississippi Head Start preschoolers. Standardized measurement and analysis procedures were used in both of these two-stage stratified randomized probability design prevalence studies, which resulted in comparative, representative samples.
Results: Chi-square analyses revealed that overall obesity rates between 2005 (20.6%) and 2010 (20.8%) had not changed, nor had the overall obesity rates between 2005 and 2010 for Black and White boys, or Black girls; however, White girls' rates significantly declined from 2005 (23.5% versus 14.8%, p=0.04). Age group comparisons indicated declines in rates of 3-year-olds (20.3% versus 13.1%, p=0.05).
 Analyses for overall overweight rates indicated insignificant changes between 2005 (17.9%) and 2010 (17.0%). However, increases were found in White boys (8.5% versus 17.1%, p=0.04), and decreases were found in Black boys (19.6% versus 15.9%, p=0.05). Black and White girls had no significant changes.  Conclusion: 
These findings, while indicating high obesity rates for Mississippi low-income preschoolers, mimic the trend toward stabilization of overall obesity/overweight rates noted in other USA preschool populations, and have implications for evaluation of health interventions and policy as well as further research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Five-Year Comparison of the Prevalence of Low-Income Preschooler Overweight and Obesityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155906-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Five-Year Comparison of the Prevalence of Low-Income Preschooler Overweight and Obesity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harbaugh, Bonnie Lee, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Mississippi</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Asbury Research Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Bonnie.Harbaugh@usm.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Jerome R. Kolbo PhD, ACSW, Professor<br/>Elaine F. Molaison PhD, RD, Associate Professor<br/>Lei Zhang PhD, MPH, Director of Health Data and Research</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[22nd International Nursing Research Congress - Research Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp;This longitudinal prevalence study compares 2005 and 2010 overweight/obesity trends in representative samples of low-income Head Start preschoolers. Significance: Child obesity is a significant global nursing issue because of its' negative health consequences. Framework: Child obesity is of concern to nurses due to the risk of early onset of obesity-related illnesses and the potential longevity of lifetime exposure to those illnesses. Approximately 21% of Mississippi Head Start (low-income) preschoolers are obese, compared to 14% for USA low-income preschoolers, and have many risk factors including obese family members, poverty, and low breastfeeding rates. Weight trend analyses are necessary for disease surveillance and health policy evaluation. <br/>Methods:&nbsp;Chi-Square analyses were used to compare the 2005 (N=1250) and 2010 (N=1765) Body Mass Indexes of Mississippi Head Start preschoolers. Standardized measurement and analysis procedures were used in both of these two-stage stratified randomized probability design prevalence studies, which resulted in comparative, representative samples. <br/>Results: Chi-square analyses revealed that overall obesity rates between 2005 (20.6%) and 2010 (20.8%) had not changed, nor had the overall obesity rates between 2005 and 2010 for Black and White boys, or Black girls; however, White girls' rates significantly declined from 2005 (23.5% versus 14.8%, p=0.04). Age group comparisons indicated declines in rates of 3-year-olds (20.3% versus 13.1%, p=0.05). <br/>&nbsp;Analyses for overall overweight rates indicated insignificant changes between 2005 (17.9%) and 2010 (17.0%). However, increases were found in White boys (8.5% versus 17.1%, p=0.04), and decreases were found in Black boys (19.6% versus 15.9%, p=0.05). Black and White girls had no significant changes. &nbsp;Conclusion:&nbsp;<br/>These findings, while indicating high obesity rates for Mississippi low-income preschoolers, mimic the trend toward stabilization of overall obesity/overweight rates noted in other USA preschool populations, and have implications for evaluation of health interventions and policy as well as further research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:16:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:16:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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