2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155937
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV/AIDS Knowledge in Nicaraguan Nursing Students
Abstract:
HIV/AIDS Knowledge in Nicaraguan Nursing Students
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Molloy, Suzanne B., PhD, RN-CS, ANP
P.I. Institution Name:George Mason University
Title:Adjunct Professor GMU CHHS, and Nurse Practitioner GMU Student Health Services
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] In Nicaragua, the combination of poverty, lack of education, early sexual activity, drug use, high birthrate, and migration fuel the potential for the spread of HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this presentation is to share the results of a study that assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge in Nicaraguan students of nursing.
This descriptive study used a convenience sample of 290 Nicaraguan students of nursing from the Universidad Politecnica de Nicaragua, (UPOLI), enrolled at the main campus in Managua, and at three distance-learning regional campuses. A culturally appropriate, true/false HIV/AIDS knowledge survey, developed by the presenter and validated by US and Nicaraguan HIV/AIDS nurse experts, was administered to participants in Spanish, along with a second qualitative survey where the students wrote a paragraph about a time they wished they had more HIV/AIDS knowledge.
The participants had fair HIV/AIDS knowledge based on the percent correct on the true/false Survey 1 (mean=68.95%, SD=10.01). There were no differences in the mean percent correct according to nursing program type, and no correlation between age and percent correct. The mean percent correct for participants who had cared for patients with HIV/AIDS was significantly higher than for those who had not cared for these patients. Even with fair knowledge, there were large gaps of basic HIV/AIDS information in prevention, transmission, testing, treatment, universal precautions, and issues directly related to Nicaragua.
In the qualitative survey, the participants revealed a lack of resources and a strong desire to learn more about HIV/AIDS. They listed factors that would help, hinder, encourage, or discourage them from acquiring HIV/AIDS knowledge. Themes of the reflective paragraphs included frustration, fear, sadness, helplessness, and moving forward. They wrote about their future hopes and concerns about helping, professional nursing responsibility, ethical behavior, and God as a source of spiritual strength and support.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV/AIDS Knowledge in Nicaraguan Nursing Studentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155937-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV/AIDS Knowledge in Nicaraguan Nursing Students</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Molloy, Suzanne B., PhD, RN-CS, ANP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">George Mason University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Professor GMU CHHS, and Nurse Practitioner GMU Student Health Services</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smolloy@gmu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] In Nicaragua, the combination of poverty, lack of education, early sexual activity, drug use, high birthrate, and migration fuel the potential for the spread of HIV/AIDS. The purpose of this presentation is to share the results of a study that assessed HIV/AIDS knowledge in Nicaraguan students of nursing. <br/>This descriptive study used a convenience sample of 290 Nicaraguan students of nursing from the Universidad Politecnica de Nicaragua, (UPOLI), enrolled at the main campus in Managua, and at three distance-learning regional campuses. A culturally appropriate, true/false HIV/AIDS knowledge survey, developed by the presenter and validated by US and Nicaraguan HIV/AIDS nurse experts, was administered to participants in Spanish, along with a second qualitative survey where the students wrote a paragraph about a time they wished they had more HIV/AIDS knowledge. <br/>The participants had fair HIV/AIDS knowledge based on the percent correct on the true/false Survey 1 (mean=68.95%, SD=10.01). There were no differences in the mean percent correct according to nursing program type, and no correlation between age and percent correct. The mean percent correct for participants who had cared for patients with HIV/AIDS was significantly higher than for those who had not cared for these patients. Even with fair knowledge, there were large gaps of basic HIV/AIDS information in prevention, transmission, testing, treatment, universal precautions, and issues directly related to Nicaragua. <br/>In the qualitative survey, the participants revealed a lack of resources and a strong desire to learn more about HIV/AIDS. They listed factors that would help, hinder, encourage, or discourage them from acquiring HIV/AIDS knowledge. Themes of the reflective paragraphs included frustration, fear, sadness, helplessness, and moving forward. They wrote about their future hopes and concerns about helping, professional nursing responsibility, ethical behavior, and God as a source of spiritual strength and support.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:17:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:17:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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