Stigma Toward Nurses Suffering from Mental Health Problems: A Study of Hospital Nurses in Japan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155955
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stigma Toward Nurses Suffering from Mental Health Problems: A Study of Hospital Nurses in Japan
Abstract:
Stigma Toward Nurses Suffering from Mental Health Problems: A Study of Hospital Nurses in Japan
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Tominaga, Maki, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Hyogo University of Health Sciences
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Akiko Miki PhD, Associate Professor
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Purpose: This study examined the stigma toward nurses suffering from mental health problems, and suggests effective countermeasures. Methods:  Study approval was obtained from the institutional ethics committee, University of Tsukuba in 2010. We distributed anonymous self-administered questionnaires to all staff nurses and nurse managers (n=880) who attended lectures organized by prefectural nursing associations (n=6) in Japan. The questionnaire addressed basic attributes, experience participants had working or supporting/managing the nurses, and the nurses? clinical condition and outcome. We developed stigma items concerning nurses suffering from each physical and mental health problem after reviewing relevant studies and discussions with several researchers. The participants were asked about the degree of each stigma item of two health problems on a five-point scale. Higher values indicate stronger stigma. The response rate was 80% (701 nurses). We calculated descriptive statistics about basic attributes and each stigma item. After conducting factor analysis concerning stigma items, we calculated the reliability coefficient and the correlation coefficients between physical stigma and mental stigma score, including t-test and ANOVA to examine differences between basic attributes. Results: Seventy-one percent responded that they have worked with nurses suffering from mental health problems. Compared to the score of stigma items of physical health problems, 6 out of 7 items were significantly higher in those of mental health problems. Results showed a single factor of each physical or mental stigma, and those who have worked with or supported/managed nurses suffering from mental problems have higher stigma. While age and the number of working years showed significant differences between each stigma item score, sex and job position didn?t show a significant difference. Conclusion: The results suggested the stigma towards nurses suffering from mental health problems is related to individual experiences. Measures to decrease prejudice in the workplace are needed in hospitals in Japan.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStigma Toward Nurses Suffering from Mental Health Problems: A Study of Hospital Nurses in Japanen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155955-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stigma Toward Nurses Suffering from Mental Health Problems:&nbsp;A Study of Hospital Nurses in Japan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tominaga, Maki, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hyogo University of Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">temakimaki@huhs.ac.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Akiko Miki PhD, Associate Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Purpose:&nbsp;This study examined the stigma toward nurses suffering from mental health problems, and suggests effective countermeasures. Methods:&nbsp;&nbsp;Study approval was obtained from the institutional ethics committee, University of Tsukuba in 2010. We distributed anonymous self-administered questionnaires to all staff nurses and nurse managers (n=880) who attended lectures organized by prefectural nursing associations (n=6) in Japan. The questionnaire addressed basic attributes, experience participants had working or supporting/managing the nurses, and the nurses? clinical condition and outcome. We developed stigma items concerning nurses suffering from each physical and mental health problem after reviewing relevant studies and discussions with several researchers. The participants were asked about the degree of each stigma item of two health problems on a five-point scale. Higher values indicate stronger stigma. The response rate was 80% (701 nurses). We calculated descriptive statistics about basic attributes and each stigma item. After conducting factor analysis concerning stigma items, we calculated the reliability coefficient and the correlation coefficients between physical stigma and mental stigma score, including t-test and ANOVA to examine differences between basic attributes. Results:&nbsp;Seventy-one percent responded that they have worked with nurses suffering from mental health problems. Compared to the score of stigma items of physical health problems, 6 out of 7 items were significantly higher in those of mental health problems. Results showed a single factor of each physical or mental stigma, and those who have worked with or supported/managed nurses suffering from mental problems have higher stigma. While age and the number of working years showed significant differences between each stigma item score, sex and job position didn?t show a significant difference. Conclusion:&nbsp;The results suggested the stigma towards nurses suffering from mental health problems is related to individual experiences. Measures to decrease prejudice in the workplace are needed in hospitals in Japan.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:18:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:18:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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