Factors associated with parental coping in families with chronically ill children dependent upon home intravenous therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155964
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors associated with parental coping in families with chronically ill children dependent upon home intravenous therapy
Abstract:
Factors associated with parental coping in families with chronically ill children dependent upon home intravenous therapy
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Kiernan, Barbara, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE
P.I. Institution Name:University of Kentucky, College of NursingMedical College of Georgia
Title:Assistant Professor, Parent-Child Nursing
This study explored the factors associated with parental coping in

families having chronically ill children dependent upon home

intravenous therapy. Because the home has become the setting for

many children whose survival is dependent upon technology, many

parents have had to assume the role of continuous health care

provider. Support by health care personnel may be variable.

Consequently, there was a need to identify what variables impact on

the parental ability to cope with the situation.



A convenience sample of 97 parents/caregivers, recruited nationally

from home health care agencies, specialty clinics of large medical

centers and through advertisement in parent newsletters of special

needs organizations, participated in the study. Interviews were

arranged and conducted by telephone. The structured interview

included measures of family functioning (Family APGAR, Smilkstein,

1978; and Family Well-Being Assessment, Caldwell, 1988) and a

modified version of parental coping (Coping Health Inventory for

Parents, McCubbin et al, 1983), as well as demographic data such as

the child's age, diagnosis, type of intravenous therapy, and family

characteristics.



Stepwise multiple regression was used to analyze the independent

variables of age, income, level of education, marital status,

severity of illness, severity of diagnosis as perceived by the

parent, and family functioning. Three coping patterns comprised

the dependent variable. Significant variables included: income (p

< .002) in maintaining optimism and a sense of parental

responsibility; marital status (p < .0001) in intimate and peer

support; and both age (p < .008) and marital status (p < .04) with

divergent and respite activities. Although both measures of family

functioning correlated significantly with the intimate and peer

support coping pattern, neither measure was significant in the

regression analysis.



Implications for nursing include the continued assessment of

families post-discharge to maintain optimum care at home and to

offer support services when coping resources are diminished or

compromised.



This study was supported by the National Center for Nursing

Research (F31 NRO 6268-02).



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors associated with parental coping in families with chronically ill children dependent upon home intravenous therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155964-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Factors associated with parental coping in families with chronically ill children dependent upon home intravenous therapy</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kiernan, Barbara, MSN/MN/MNSc/MNE</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Kentucky, College of NursingMedical College of Georgia</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor, Parent-Child Nursing</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study explored the factors associated with parental coping in<br/><br/>families having chronically ill children dependent upon home<br/><br/>intravenous therapy. Because the home has become the setting for<br/><br/>many children whose survival is dependent upon technology, many<br/><br/>parents have had to assume the role of continuous health care<br/><br/>provider. Support by health care personnel may be variable.<br/><br/>Consequently, there was a need to identify what variables impact on<br/><br/>the parental ability to cope with the situation.<br/><br/><br/><br/>A convenience sample of 97 parents/caregivers, recruited nationally<br/><br/>from home health care agencies, specialty clinics of large medical<br/><br/>centers and through advertisement in parent newsletters of special<br/><br/>needs organizations, participated in the study. Interviews were<br/><br/>arranged and conducted by telephone. The structured interview<br/><br/>included measures of family functioning (Family APGAR, Smilkstein,<br/><br/>1978; and Family Well-Being Assessment, Caldwell, 1988) and a<br/><br/>modified version of parental coping (Coping Health Inventory for<br/><br/>Parents, McCubbin et al, 1983), as well as demographic data such as<br/><br/>the child's age, diagnosis, type of intravenous therapy, and family<br/><br/>characteristics.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Stepwise multiple regression was used to analyze the independent<br/><br/>variables of age, income, level of education, marital status,<br/><br/>severity of illness, severity of diagnosis as perceived by the<br/><br/>parent, and family functioning. Three coping patterns comprised<br/><br/>the dependent variable. Significant variables included: income (p<br/><br/>&lt; .002) in maintaining optimism and a sense of parental<br/><br/>responsibility; marital status (p &lt; .0001) in intimate and peer<br/><br/>support; and both age (p &lt; .008) and marital status (p &lt; .04) with<br/><br/>divergent and respite activities. Although both measures of family<br/><br/>functioning correlated significantly with the intimate and peer<br/><br/>support coping pattern, neither measure was significant in the<br/><br/>regression analysis.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Implications for nursing include the continued assessment of<br/><br/>families post-discharge to maintain optimum care at home and to<br/><br/>offer support services when coping resources are diminished or<br/><br/>compromised.<br/><br/><br/><br/>This study was supported by the National Center for Nursing<br/><br/>Research (F31 NRO 6268-02).<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:19:29Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:19:29Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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