2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155967
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of term and preterm infant feeding outcomes
Abstract:
Correlates of term and preterm infant feeding outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Pridham, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Professor Emeritus
In this study, factors that were associated with feeding outcomes - dietary intake, somatic growth, and development - for infants in their first post-term year were examined. Feeding outcomes and their correlates for two groups of infants who were prematurely born, of very low birth weight (<1500 g), and with a history of lung disease, and for a group of healthy infants born at term were examined. One group of the premature infants had recovered from acute, transient respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The second group of the premature infants had a chronic lung disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The study objectives were to: a) describe and compare, for the three groups of infants, feeding outcomes over the first post-term year; b) learn what contribution three types of variables - infant biologic, maternal experience, and maternal working model - made to maternal feeding behavior, after controlling maternal resources; c) examine the effect of maternal and infant feeding behavior on feeding outcomes; and d) examine differences between the three groups of mother-infant pairs in how maternal and infant feeding behavior and feeding outcomes were related.



The design of the study was correlational and longitudinal. Four home visits were made at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months post-term age to collect data. Data collection methods included interviews, observation of feeding and the home environment, parent self-report instruments, a diet intake and activity log and a calendar of acute illnesses kept by the mother, and measures of infant growth and oxygenation. Families of premature infants were recruited to the study through three neonatal intensive care units. Mothers of healthy infants born at term were recruited through WIC, family practice, and pediatric clinics. Complete data were collected for 114 mothers and their infants (31 with BPD, 30 recovered from RDS, and 53 in the healthy, term-born group).



Although the two groups of premature infants did not differ from the group of healthy infants born at term in rate of weight gain, this rate was not adequate for the premature infants, on the average, to catch up in weight. As the premature infants grew older, more of them, on the whole, were either faltering or failing in growth, compared to population norms. The mother's age and education and infant biological condition variables, such as birth weight and neurobiological risk, contributed to the variance in maternal positive and negative feeding behavior at each of the four assessments. However, the contribution of maternal symptoms of depression and parenting stress and of the mother's working model of infant feeding to maternal feeding behavior depended on the time of the assessment.



Neither the infant's feeding behavior or biologic conditions (birth weight or neurobiologic risk) had an effect on caloric or protein intake after 1 month post-term age. Little evidence of an effect of infant positive or negative feeding behavior on growth in weight, length, or mid-arm muscle circumference was found, nor was there evidence that feeding behavior operated through dietary intake to growth. Infant feeding behavior may be an indicator of the infant's developmental status as the infant grows older. Further study of infant and maternal feeding behavior in relation to an infant's dietary intake at specific meals and identification of other variables potentially involved in the unexpected negative relationship of infant positive behavior with growth measures is needed.



The infant's current respiratory health status as well as the diagnosis/maturity status (BPD, RDS, or healthy term) were associated with both mental and motor development. Evidence for a greater effect of maternal feeding behavior on infant feeding behavior was found for infants with BPD than for the healthier premature infants. Infant positive feeding behavior of the very low birth weight, premature infants had a greater effect at both 4 and 8 months on the weight-for-age z score.



The study findings document the contribution of maternal and infant feeding behaviors on infant dietary intake, growth, and development outcomes in addition to the contribution of infant biologic conditions, particularly for the very-low-birth weight infants with a history of lung disease. This kind of evidence has not been available previously. Furthermore, study findings provide support for an intervention to facilitate adaptive maternal and infant feeding behavior, since some growth outcomes were influenced by feeding behavior. Other variables, for example, energy expenditure, that may influence infant dietary intake, growth, and development need to be identified and examined, and the variability within groups need to be explored. How the mother's working model of feeding influences her feeding behavior, and how the mother's feeding behavior affects the infant's task-related as well as social-emotional feeding behavior needs to be examined.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of term and preterm infant feeding outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155967-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlates of term and preterm infant feeding outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pridham, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor Emeritus</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kpridham@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In this study, factors that were associated with feeding outcomes - dietary intake, somatic growth, and development - for infants in their first post-term year were examined. Feeding outcomes and their correlates for two groups of infants who were prematurely born, of very low birth weight (&lt;1500 g), and with a history of lung disease, and for a group of healthy infants born at term were examined. One group of the premature infants had recovered from acute, transient respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The second group of the premature infants had a chronic lung disease, bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The study objectives were to: a) describe and compare, for the three groups of infants, feeding outcomes over the first post-term year; b) learn what contribution three types of variables - infant biologic, maternal experience, and maternal working model - made to maternal feeding behavior, after controlling maternal resources; c) examine the effect of maternal and infant feeding behavior on feeding outcomes; and d) examine differences between the three groups of mother-infant pairs in how maternal and infant feeding behavior and feeding outcomes were related.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The design of the study was correlational and longitudinal. Four home visits were made at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months post-term age to collect data. Data collection methods included interviews, observation of feeding and the home environment, parent self-report instruments, a diet intake and activity log and a calendar of acute illnesses kept by the mother, and measures of infant growth and oxygenation. Families of premature infants were recruited to the study through three neonatal intensive care units. Mothers of healthy infants born at term were recruited through WIC, family practice, and pediatric clinics. Complete data were collected for 114 mothers and their infants (31 with BPD, 30 recovered from RDS, and 53 in the healthy, term-born group).<br/><br/><br/><br/>Although the two groups of premature infants did not differ from the group of healthy infants born at term in rate of weight gain, this rate was not adequate for the premature infants, on the average, to catch up in weight. As the premature infants grew older, more of them, on the whole, were either faltering or failing in growth, compared to population norms. The mother's age and education and infant biological condition variables, such as birth weight and neurobiological risk, contributed to the variance in maternal positive and negative feeding behavior at each of the four assessments. However, the contribution of maternal symptoms of depression and parenting stress and of the mother's working model of infant feeding to maternal feeding behavior depended on the time of the assessment.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Neither the infant's feeding behavior or biologic conditions (birth weight or neurobiologic risk) had an effect on caloric or protein intake after 1 month post-term age. Little evidence of an effect of infant positive or negative feeding behavior on growth in weight, length, or mid-arm muscle circumference was found, nor was there evidence that feeding behavior operated through dietary intake to growth. Infant feeding behavior may be an indicator of the infant's developmental status as the infant grows older. Further study of infant and maternal feeding behavior in relation to an infant's dietary intake at specific meals and identification of other variables potentially involved in the unexpected negative relationship of infant positive behavior with growth measures is needed.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The infant's current respiratory health status as well as the diagnosis/maturity status (BPD, RDS, or healthy term) were associated with both mental and motor development. Evidence for a greater effect of maternal feeding behavior on infant feeding behavior was found for infants with BPD than for the healthier premature infants. Infant positive feeding behavior of the very low birth weight, premature infants had a greater effect at both 4 and 8 months on the weight-for-age z score.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The study findings document the contribution of maternal and infant feeding behaviors on infant dietary intake, growth, and development outcomes in addition to the contribution of infant biologic conditions, particularly for the very-low-birth weight infants with a history of lung disease. This kind of evidence has not been available previously. Furthermore, study findings provide support for an intervention to facilitate adaptive maternal and infant feeding behavior, since some growth outcomes were influenced by feeding behavior. Other variables, for example, energy expenditure, that may influence infant dietary intake, growth, and development need to be identified and examined, and the variability within groups need to be explored. How the mother's working model of feeding influences her feeding behavior, and how the mother's feeding behavior affects the infant's task-related as well as social-emotional feeding behavior needs to be examined.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:19:39Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:19:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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