The Effects of Cumulative Trauma on Emotional and Physical Health, and Risky Behavior in Adolescents: PTSD Symptomatology and Parental Emotional Support as Mediators

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155972
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Cumulative Trauma on Emotional and Physical Health, and Risky Behavior in Adolescents: PTSD Symptomatology and Parental Emotional Support as Mediators
Abstract:
The Effects of Cumulative Trauma on Emotional and Physical Health, and Risky Behavior in Adolescents: PTSD Symptomatology and Parental Emotional Support as Mediators
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Lewandowski, Linda A., PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University/Children's Hospital of Michigan
Co-Authors:Lisa Chiodo, PhD; Barbara Peterson and Ibrahim Kira, PhD
[Research Presentation] The effects of cumulative trauma (CT) on physical and emotional health and risk-taking behaviors is important in teens. Social support may be a buffer, but little is known about specific types of support. The purpose was to assess the combined contribution of CT and other factors that may adversely impact health risk behavior in two urban teen cohorts. The study sample (N = 371) included adolescents, ages 12-16, from two high traumaûexposure cohorts: African American and Iraqi refugees. Instruments administered: the Child Health and Illness Profile - Adolescent Edition (CHIP-AE), the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, the Cumulative Trauma Scale (CTS- cumulative count of trauma events-CT), and the Child and Adolescent Social Support Scale. The health risk behaviors (CHIP-AE) examined were the emotional (ED) and physical discomfort (PD) scales and the risk-taking behavior (RTB) scale. Univariate ANOVA examined the relation between factors that may adversely impact health risk behavior. ED, PD, RTB, PTSD total score, parent emotional support, gender, ethnicity, and a high vs. low trauma count score were entered into the GLM. Gender, ethnicity and interaction terms were also examined. Although CT was significantly correlated with ED, PD, and risk-taking, PTSD and parental emotional support accounted for most of the variance. ED and PD were significantly related only to the PTSD total score and parental emotional support. For the risk-taking scale, although PTSD score was uniquely related, parent emotional support was not. Boys with high levels of trauma engaged in more risky behavior including substance abuse. The relation between CT, ED, PD, and risky behavior is fully mediated by parental emotional support and PTSD symptoms. Traumatized teens who have high PTSD symptoms and low parental emotional support are most at risk for negative health and risky behaviors. Nursing interventions should promote parental emotional support of teens who are victims of trauma.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Cumulative Trauma on Emotional and Physical Health, and Risky Behavior in Adolescents: PTSD Symptomatology and Parental Emotional Support as Mediatorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155972-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Effects of Cumulative Trauma on Emotional and Physical Health, and Risky Behavior in Adolescents: PTSD Symptomatology and Parental Emotional Support as Mediators</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lewandowski, Linda A., PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University/Children's Hospital of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">llewandowski@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Lisa Chiodo, PhD; Barbara Peterson and Ibrahim Kira, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] The effects of cumulative trauma (CT) on physical and emotional health and risk-taking behaviors is important in teens. Social support may be a buffer, but little is known about specific types of support. The purpose was to assess the combined contribution of CT and other factors that may adversely impact health risk behavior in two urban teen cohorts. The study sample (N = 371) included adolescents, ages 12-16, from two high trauma&ucirc;exposure cohorts: African American and Iraqi refugees. Instruments administered: the Child Health and Illness Profile - Adolescent Edition (CHIP-AE), the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale, the Cumulative Trauma Scale (CTS- cumulative count of trauma events-CT), and the Child and Adolescent Social Support Scale. The health risk behaviors (CHIP-AE) examined were the emotional (ED) and physical discomfort (PD) scales and the risk-taking behavior (RTB) scale. Univariate ANOVA examined the relation between factors that may adversely impact health risk behavior. ED, PD, RTB, PTSD total score, parent emotional support, gender, ethnicity, and a high vs. low trauma count score were entered into the GLM. Gender, ethnicity and interaction terms were also examined. Although CT was significantly correlated with ED, PD, and risk-taking, PTSD and parental emotional support accounted for most of the variance. ED and PD were significantly related only to the PTSD total score and parental emotional support. For the risk-taking scale, although PTSD score was uniquely related, parent emotional support was not. Boys with high levels of trauma engaged in more risky behavior including substance abuse. The relation between CT, ED, PD, and risky behavior is fully mediated by parental emotional support and PTSD symptoms. Traumatized teens who have high PTSD symptoms and low parental emotional support are most at risk for negative health and risky behaviors. Nursing interventions should promote parental emotional support of teens who are victims of trauma.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:19:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:19:55Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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