Preventing suicide lethality among vulnerable youth: A school-based prevention intervention program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155978
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Preventing suicide lethality among vulnerable youth: A school-based prevention intervention program
Abstract:
Preventing suicide lethality among vulnerable youth: A school-based prevention intervention program
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:1992
Conference Date:August 6 - 8, 1992
Author:Eggert, Leona, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of WashingtonSchool of Nursing
Title:Professor
Central Theme. The central theme of this symposium is preventive intervention research in the schools: preventing adolescent suicide, the second leading cause of death among youth 15 to 19 years of age. This work involves extensive collaboration and teamwork among a multi-disciplinary team of researchers, public school personnel, clinical specialists, district administrators and the school board. Internationally, schools represent one of the greatest investments of a nation's people in their youth. These investments are in the form of talented people, finances, time and energy. They manifest our hope that schools will promote the healthy growth and development of the young and contribute to strong citizens, communities and societal well-being. Thus schools have been a logical context for health promotion and prevention of emerging behavioral and psychosocial problems.



In 1990, the research program was one of only three in the country funded to test ways of preventing adolescent suicide; it was the only one funded to test a school-based model for vulnerable youth, identified substance users/potential dropouts. The research program aims are: A. To test the efficacy of a school-based suicide prevention program for decreasing: (1) suicide ideation/behaviors, (2) depression (depressed affect, helplessness, loneliness), (3) drug involvement (drug/alcohol use, problems with control and adverse consequences), and (4) school deviance (truancy and underachievement in grades, credits earned); and B. To test a multivariate causal model for the effects of multiple prior risk factors and intervention factors (life skills training, teacher and peer group caring and support) on levels of depression and suicide risk.



Purpose. The symposium is designed to provide nurses and other health professionals with information and methods used to: (1) identify vulnerable youth at risk of suicide behaviors and recruit them into the study; (2) construct a structured clinical interview suitable for research purposes to assess vulnerable youths' levels of suicide risk and calculate a lethality index; and (3) intervene within a school context to prevent suicide behaviors and promote emotional well-being among program participants. The challenges presented and findings discussed are applicable to nursing research and its utilization in a number of ways. This symposium is not only designed for persons interested in preventing adolescent suicide; it is also for those interested in field research and those committed to using the educational system to test models of care that prevent behavioral and psychosocial problems and promote the healthy development of community members.



Overview. The three papers proposed are from studies of more than 300 suicidal and non-suicidal vulnerable (high-risk) youth, part of the larger research program with 1,000 youth. Findings presented in the first paper have implications for assessing the behavioral and psychosocial risk factors associated with adolescent suicide behaviors. In the second paper, the author details the construction of an adolescent suicide lethality index. Of special interest are experimental tests of an interactive, computerized version of this clinical, research instrument for assessing suicide potential. The authors of the third paper present findings of the effectiveness of the school-based intervention program, called Personal Growth Class and structured as a high-school elective offering.



Studies presented illuminate a profile of vulnerabilities among high-risk youth and promising assessment and school-based preventive interventions. Suicide risk factors are shown to be complex and, therefore, not alleviated by quick-fix responses. The challenge for clinicians, researchers and administrators is to coordinate school-based prevention efforts that reduce the incidence and prevalence of suicide behaviors among our youth.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
6-Aug-1992
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePreventing suicide lethality among vulnerable youth: A school-based prevention intervention programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155978-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Preventing suicide lethality among vulnerable youth: A school-based prevention intervention program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1992</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">August 6 - 8, 1992</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Eggert, Leona, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of WashingtonSchool of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Central Theme. The central theme of this symposium is preventive intervention research in the schools: preventing adolescent suicide, the second leading cause of death among youth 15 to 19 years of age. This work involves extensive collaboration and teamwork among a multi-disciplinary team of researchers, public school personnel, clinical specialists, district administrators and the school board. Internationally, schools represent one of the greatest investments of a nation's people in their youth. These investments are in the form of talented people, finances, time and energy. They manifest our hope that schools will promote the healthy growth and development of the young and contribute to strong citizens, communities and societal well-being. Thus schools have been a logical context for health promotion and prevention of emerging behavioral and psychosocial problems.<br/><br/><br/><br/>In 1990, the research program was one of only three in the country funded to test ways of preventing adolescent suicide; it was the only one funded to test a school-based model for vulnerable youth, identified substance users/potential dropouts. The research program aims are: A. To test the efficacy of a school-based suicide prevention program for decreasing: (1) suicide ideation/behaviors, (2) depression (depressed affect, helplessness, loneliness), (3) drug involvement (drug/alcohol use, problems with control and adverse consequences), and (4) school deviance (truancy and underachievement in grades, credits earned); and B. To test a multivariate causal model for the effects of multiple prior risk factors and intervention factors (life skills training, teacher and peer group caring and support) on levels of depression and suicide risk.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Purpose. The symposium is designed to provide nurses and other health professionals with information and methods used to: (1) identify vulnerable youth at risk of suicide behaviors and recruit them into the study; (2) construct a structured clinical interview suitable for research purposes to assess vulnerable youths' levels of suicide risk and calculate a lethality index; and (3) intervene within a school context to prevent suicide behaviors and promote emotional well-being among program participants. The challenges presented and findings discussed are applicable to nursing research and its utilization in a number of ways. This symposium is not only designed for persons interested in preventing adolescent suicide; it is also for those interested in field research and those committed to using the educational system to test models of care that prevent behavioral and psychosocial problems and promote the healthy development of community members.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Overview. The three papers proposed are from studies of more than 300 suicidal and non-suicidal vulnerable (high-risk) youth, part of the larger research program with 1,000 youth. Findings presented in the first paper have implications for assessing the behavioral and psychosocial risk factors associated with adolescent suicide behaviors. In the second paper, the author details the construction of an adolescent suicide lethality index. Of special interest are experimental tests of an interactive, computerized version of this clinical, research instrument for assessing suicide potential. The authors of the third paper present findings of the effectiveness of the school-based intervention program, called Personal Growth Class and structured as a high-school elective offering.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Studies presented illuminate a profile of vulnerabilities among high-risk youth and promising assessment and school-based preventive interventions. Suicide risk factors are shown to be complex and, therefore, not alleviated by quick-fix responses. The challenge for clinicians, researchers and administrators is to coordinate school-based prevention efforts that reduce the incidence and prevalence of suicide behaviors among our youth.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:20:15Z-
dc.date.issued1992-08-06en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:20:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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