Emergency Preparedness and Professional Competency among Healthcare Providers during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/155996
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Emergency Preparedness and Professional Competency among Healthcare Providers during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita
Abstract:
Emergency Preparedness and Professional Competency among Healthcare Providers during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Slepski, Lynn A., MSN
P.I. Institution Name:Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
Title:Captain
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Background: No systematic examination of the preparedness of healthcare providers and response capabilities during a large scale disaster has been conducted. As a result, very little is known about what knowledge, skills and abilities, or professional competencies are neededùinformation critical for designing effective training content. The objective of this IRB-approved study was to examine the issue of emergency preparedness and professional competencies in actual disaster responders. Methods: In fall 2007 an invitation to participate was sent out through professional and responder organizations to MDs and RNs over the age of 18 who responded to Hurricane Katrina or Rita in Alabama, Louisiana or Mississippi. Participants were asked to complete an anonymous 544-item web-based questionnaire designed to elicit information on their perceptions of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required during their response. Preliminary Results: Of the 196 respondents, (31% - MDs, 69% - RNs) 76% provided direct patient care. Despite the fact that 78% deployed as part of an organized group (25% USPHS) the response transition was difficult as prior to leaving only 43% knew what role they would perform; what professional items to take (38%); how to protect themselves (27%); or what their decision-making authorities were (37%). Only 40% had someone available to answer questions or demonstrate something they did not know or felt uncomfortable doing despite 81% identifying having someone available as important/very important. Conclusion: Responders often end up performing roles/tasks for which they are not prepared. Further study is needed on how to better prepare individuals to respond.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEmergency Preparedness and Professional Competency among Healthcare Providers during Hurricanes Katrina and Ritaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/155996-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Emergency Preparedness and Professional Competency among Healthcare Providers during Hurricanes Katrina and Rita</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Slepski, Lynn A., MSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Captain</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Lynn.Slepski@dhs.gov</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Background: No systematic examination of the preparedness of healthcare providers and response capabilities during a large scale disaster has been conducted. As a result, very little is known about what knowledge, skills and abilities, or professional competencies are needed&ugrave;information critical for designing effective training content. The objective of this IRB-approved study was to examine the issue of emergency preparedness and professional competencies in actual disaster responders. Methods: In fall 2007 an invitation to participate was sent out through professional and responder organizations to MDs and RNs over the age of 18 who responded to Hurricane Katrina or Rita in Alabama, Louisiana or Mississippi. Participants were asked to complete an anonymous 544-item web-based questionnaire designed to elicit information on their perceptions of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required during their response. Preliminary Results: Of the 196 respondents, (31% - MDs, 69% - RNs) 76% provided direct patient care. Despite the fact that 78% deployed as part of an organized group (25% USPHS) the response transition was difficult as prior to leaving only 43% knew what role they would perform; what professional items to take (38%); how to protect themselves (27%); or what their decision-making authorities were (37%). Only 40% had someone available to answer questions or demonstrate something they did not know or felt uncomfortable doing despite 81% identifying having someone available as important/very important. Conclusion: Responders often end up performing roles/tasks for which they are not prepared. Further study is needed on how to better prepare individuals to respond.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:21:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:21:17Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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