Snoezelen Room: The Use of Technology to Reduce Agitated Behaviours Among Geriatric Patients with Schizophrenia,áa Literature Review

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156010
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Snoezelen Room: The Use of Technology to Reduce Agitated Behaviours Among Geriatric Patients with Schizophrenia,áa Literature Review
Abstract:
Snoezelen Room: The Use of Technology to Reduce Agitated Behaviours Among Geriatric Patients with Schizophrenia,áa Literature Review
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Yeap, Beow Im, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Institute of Mental Health/Woodbridge Hospital
Title:Staff Nurse
Co-Authors:Kit Kit Yong, RN, RMN, CertGeronNursing, BHSc(Nursing); Therese Ann Galistan, RN, RMN, BHSc(Nursing), MHSG; Suyin Aileen Leow, RN, RMN; Joseph Ng, DiplomainOccupationalTherapy, DiplomaAromatherapy; Chee Lien Poh, RN, BN, AdvDiplomainNursing(Geron), MHSE;
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Background: Agitation is a common and challenging phenomenon among institutionalized geriatric patients with schizophrenia in the long-term care setting. Pharmacological interventions and restraints have commonly been used to control such behaviours (Goodall & Etters, 2005), but concerns have been raised about the safety and efficacy of such interventions, especially in the elderly (Douglas, et al., 2004). Snoezelen is a rapidly growing concept that leverage on modern technology to deliver interventions that stimulates the primary senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste, smell, vestibular and proprioception (Baillon, et al., 2002). Most studies have demonstrated positive effects of snoezelen on patients' mood, behaviour, cognition and quality of life. Aim: This paper reports the effects of snoezelen in reducing agitated behaviours among geriatric patients with schizophrenia; and evaluates available evidence to support this practice. Methodology: Articles that examined the effects of snoezelen room or multisensory therapy in reducing agitated behaviours or improving mood among geriatric patients were retrieved from EBSCO Host databases, OVID databases, CINAHL, Google and cross checking of reference lists. Search terms such as snoezelen, multisensory therapy, complimentary and alternatives medicine (CAM) therapy were used. Randomised controlled trials and reviews were included and critically appraised. The efficacy on the use of snoezelen was reported. Findings: Preliminary findings indicated that most studies demonstrated positive effects of snoezelen on people with dementia. Majority of the evidences that supported its use consisted primarily of small, anecdotal studies that lack scientific rigor. They were inconclusive and had little empirical evidence that validated the efficacy of snoezelen in reducing agitated behaviours among geriatric patients with schizophrenia. Conclusion: Despite of these, most authors commented that snoezelen is an area worthy of future research in a variety of psychiatric settings. As this will ensure that vulnerable groups like those geriatric patients with schizophrenia are not subjected to costly, inappropriate, detrimental or ineffective alternative interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSnoezelen Room: The Use of Technology to Reduce Agitated Behaviours Among Geriatric Patients with Schizophrenia,áa Literature Reviewen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156010-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Snoezelen Room: The Use of Technology to Reduce Agitated Behaviours Among Geriatric Patients with Schizophrenia,&aacute;a Literature Review</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yeap, Beow Im, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Institute of Mental Health/Woodbridge Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Staff Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Mei_Fong_LEONG@imh.com.sg</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kit Kit Yong, RN, RMN, CertGeronNursing, BHSc(Nursing); Therese Ann Galistan, RN, RMN, BHSc(Nursing), MHSG; Suyin Aileen Leow, RN, RMN; Joseph Ng, DiplomainOccupationalTherapy, DiplomaAromatherapy; Chee Lien Poh, RN, BN, AdvDiplomainNursing(Geron), MHSE; </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Background: Agitation is a common and challenging phenomenon among institutionalized geriatric patients with schizophrenia in the long-term care setting. Pharmacological interventions and restraints have commonly been used to control such behaviours (Goodall &amp; Etters, 2005), but concerns have been raised about the safety and efficacy of such interventions, especially in the elderly (Douglas, et al., 2004). Snoezelen is a rapidly growing concept that leverage on modern technology to deliver interventions that stimulates the primary senses of sight, hearing, touch, taste, smell, vestibular and proprioception (Baillon, et al., 2002). Most studies have demonstrated positive effects of snoezelen on patients' mood, behaviour, cognition and quality of life. Aim: This paper reports the effects of snoezelen in reducing agitated behaviours among geriatric patients with schizophrenia; and evaluates available evidence to support this practice. Methodology: Articles that examined the effects of snoezelen room or multisensory therapy in reducing agitated behaviours or improving mood among geriatric patients were retrieved from EBSCO Host databases, OVID databases, CINAHL, Google and cross checking of reference lists. Search terms such as snoezelen, multisensory therapy, complimentary and alternatives medicine (CAM) therapy were used. Randomised controlled trials and reviews were included and critically appraised. The efficacy on the use of snoezelen was reported. Findings: Preliminary findings indicated that most studies demonstrated positive effects of snoezelen on people with dementia. Majority of the evidences that supported its use consisted primarily of small, anecdotal studies that lack scientific rigor. They were inconclusive and had little empirical evidence that validated the efficacy of snoezelen in reducing agitated behaviours among geriatric patients with schizophrenia. Conclusion: Despite of these, most authors commented that snoezelen is an area worthy of future research in a variety of psychiatric settings. As this will ensure that vulnerable groups like those geriatric patients with schizophrenia are not subjected to costly, inappropriate, detrimental or ineffective alternative interventions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:22:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:22:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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