Nurses' Awareness of Ethical Issues Faced in Clinical Setting: Comparison of Nursing Attending Accredited Nursing Administrator Training and Nurses Attending Clinical Practice Leaders Training

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156017
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Awareness of Ethical Issues Faced in Clinical Setting: Comparison of Nursing Attending Accredited Nursing Administrator Training and Nurses Attending Clinical Practice Leaders Training
Abstract:
Nurses' Awareness of Ethical Issues Faced in Clinical Setting: Comparison of Nursing Attending Accredited Nursing Administrator Training and Nurses Attending Clinical Practice Leaders Training
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2011
Author:Kondo, Hiroko, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Hiroshima International University
Title:Professor
Co-Authors:Tomoko Shiraki RN, MS, Instructor
Tomoko Yamada RN, BS, Assistant
[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Aim: To gain an understanding of what kind of circumstances, encountered in a clinical setting by attendees of two training courses with two different professional backgrounds (Accredited Nursing Administrator Training and Clinical Practice Leaders Training), were recognized as being ethical issues, and also, to reveal what are the differences in awareness arising from the differences in professional background.
Method: 57 nurses (Group A) who attended the 2010 Accredited Nursing Administrator Training and 34 nurses (Group B) who attended the Clinical Practice Leaders Training, conducted by the Nursing Association of Prefecture A, were asked to write freely about instances, that they encountered in a clinical setting in August 2010, which they recognized as representing ethical issues. These were then analyzed by extrapolating out the content of the written descriptions, grouping the issues by similarity, categorizing them, and comparing the categories for the two training course groups.
Results: The issues recognized by the course attendees in Group A as being ethical issues came under the following eight categories; ?Providing information to patients and families in medical care,? ?Patients? and families? feelings about participating in medical care,? ?Providing a comfortable medical treatment environment,? ?Post-hospital discharge destination,? ?Relationships with doctors,? ?Life-and-death decisions,? ?Difficulties in terms of nurse?s own capabilities and practicing of nursing,? and ?Relationships between nurses.? In contrast, the issues recognized by the course attendees in Group B as being ethical issues came under the following eight categories.
Conclusion: Many of the common ethical issues were related to doctors insufficiently performing the informed consent process and differences were also seen in awareness of ethical issues faced due to differences in job title.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Awareness of Ethical Issues Faced in Clinical Setting: Comparison of Nursing Attending Accredited Nursing Administrator Training and Nurses Attending Clinical Practice Leaders Trainingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156017-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nurses' Awareness of Ethical Issues Faced in Clinical Setting: Comparison of Nursing Attending Accredited Nursing Administrator Training and Nurses Attending Clinical Practice Leaders Training</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2011</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kondo, Hiroko, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hiroshima International University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">h-kondou@ns.hirokoku-u.ac.jp</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Tomoko Shiraki RN, MS, Instructor<br/>Tomoko Yamada RN, BS, Assistant</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[2nd International Nursing Research Conference for the World Academy of Nursing Science - Presentation] Aim: To gain an understanding of what kind of circumstances, encountered in a clinical setting by attendees of two training courses with two different professional backgrounds (Accredited Nursing Administrator Training and Clinical Practice Leaders Training), were recognized as being ethical issues, and also, to reveal what are the differences in awareness arising from the differences in professional background. <br/>Method: 57 nurses (Group A) who attended the 2010 Accredited Nursing Administrator Training and 34 nurses (Group B) who attended the Clinical Practice Leaders Training, conducted by the Nursing Association of Prefecture A, were asked to write freely about instances, that they encountered in a clinical setting in August 2010, which they recognized as representing ethical issues. These were then analyzed by extrapolating out the content of the written descriptions, grouping the issues by similarity, categorizing them, and comparing the categories for the two training course groups. <br/>Results: The issues recognized by the course attendees in Group A as being ethical issues came under the following eight categories; ?Providing information to patients and families in medical care,? ?Patients? and families? feelings about participating in medical care,? ?Providing a comfortable medical treatment environment,? ?Post-hospital discharge destination,? ?Relationships with doctors,? ?Life-and-death decisions,? ?Difficulties in terms of nurse?s own capabilities and practicing of nursing,? and ?Relationships between nurses.? In contrast, the issues recognized by the course attendees in Group B as being ethical issues came under the following eight categories. <br/>Conclusion: Many of the common ethical issues were related to doctors insufficiently performing the informed consent process and differences were also seen in awareness of ethical issues faced due to differences in job title.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:22:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:22:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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