Sifting for Clarity of Evidence-Based Practice, Research and Quality Improvement: An Imperative for Global Nursing

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156021
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Sifting for Clarity of Evidence-Based Practice, Research and Quality Improvement: An Imperative for Global Nursing
Abstract:
Sifting for Clarity of Evidence-Based Practice, Research and Quality Improvement: An Imperative for Global Nursing
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Belcher, Jan, RN, PhD, PMHCNS, NEA-BC
P.I. Institution Name:Wright State University
Title:Associate Professor
[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose: As sand is sifted at the beach for closer inspection, an imperative for nurses globally is to conceptually and practically differentiate among evidenced-based practice, research and quality improvement.  International nurses are increasingly seeking Magnet Recognition for nursing excellence by American Nurses Credentialing Center which has now extended into Australia and New Zealand. Magnet Recognition appraisers examine all three distinct processes for their presence in health care organizations.  Many times, nurses confuse these three distinct processes and use one example to explain all three processes in ineffective manner.   Although the three processes can overlap, all have three distinct purposes.    Methods: Evidence-based practice uses of collective research evidence to shape general approaches to patient care, specific courses of action, and recommendations made to individual patients. Research is a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. Evidence-based practice is initiated based on the strength of collective evidence, not on one research study or a collection of quality improvement initiatives. In contrast, research generates new knowledge and tests knowledge for a discipline.  Research has more scientific rigor in methodology than quality improvement.  Institutional Review Board approval is needed prior to beginning  research for the protection of research subjects. Quality improvement resides within one organization or health care system and targets specific patient issues to improve outcomes. Results:  Without conceptual clarity of these three processes, many problems can occur. Evidenced-based practice can be implemented without adequate strength of collective research. Research can be implemented without rigor.  Patient rights can be breached in quality improvement initiatives.  Conclusion: In this presentation, a practical model is presented for conceptual differentiation and closer inspection that can be applied globally with specific nursing examples such as using patient falls in a research study, a quality improvement initiative, and an evidenced-based project.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSifting for Clarity of Evidence-Based Practice, Research and Quality Improvement: An Imperative for Global Nursingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156021-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Sifting for Clarity of Evidence-Based Practice, Research and Quality Improvement: An Imperative for Global Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Belcher, Jan, RN, PhD, PMHCNS, NEA-BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wright State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">janice.belcher@wright.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Practice Session Presentation] Purpose: As sand is sifted at the beach for closer inspection, an imperative for nurses globally is to conceptually and practically differentiate among evidenced-based practice, research and quality improvement.&nbsp; International nurses are increasingly seeking Magnet Recognition for nursing excellence by American Nurses Credentialing Center which has now extended into Australia and New Zealand. Magnet Recognition appraisers examine all three distinct processes for their presence in health care organizations.&nbsp; Many times, nurses confuse these three distinct processes and use one example to explain all three processes in ineffective manner.&nbsp;&nbsp; Although the three processes can overlap, all have three distinct purposes.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Methods: Evidence-based practice uses of collective research evidence to shape general approaches to patient care, specific courses of action, and recommendations made to individual patients. Research is a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge. Evidence-based practice is initiated based on the strength of collective evidence, not on one research study or a collection of quality improvement initiatives. In contrast, research generates new knowledge and tests knowledge for a discipline.&nbsp; Research has more scientific rigor in methodology than quality improvement.&nbsp; Institutional Review Board approval is needed prior to beginning &nbsp;research for the protection of research subjects. Quality improvement resides within one organization or health care system and targets specific patient issues to improve outcomes.&nbsp;Results:&nbsp; Without conceptual clarity of these three processes, many problems can occur. Evidenced-based practice can be implemented without adequate strength of collective research. Research can be implemented without rigor.&nbsp; Patient rights can be breached in quality improvement initiatives.&nbsp;&nbsp;Conclusion: In this presentation, a practical model is presented for conceptual differentiation and closer inspection that can be applied globally with specific nursing examples such as using patient falls in a research study, a quality improvement initiative, and an evidenced-based project.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:22:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:22:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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