Relations among Health Literacy, Medication Adherence, and BP Control in Older Korean Adults Taking Antihypertensive Agents

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156025
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relations among Health Literacy, Medication Adherence, and BP Control in Older Korean Adults Taking Antihypertensive Agents
Abstract:
Relations among Health Literacy, Medication Adherence, and BP Control in Older Korean Adults Taking Antihypertensive Agents
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Chu, Sang Hui, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Yonsei University College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Hyung Jin Moon, MS, RN; Kwang Suk Kim, PhD, RN; Dong-soo Shin; Tae Wha Lee, PhD
[Research Presentation] Purpose: Limited health literacy is associated with receiving fewer preventive services, difficulty following medication instructions, and with poorer health outcomes. The prevalence of hypertension among elderly in Korea is more than 50%. Yet, little is known about the effect of health literacy on the elderly taking antihypertensive agents in Korea. This study was conducted to evaluate how health literacy relates medication adherence and blood pressure (BP) control among the elderly taking antihypertensive agents. Methods: A face-to-face survey of 138 elderly taking antihypertensive agents aged 65 or older in Seoul was conducted through home visit. Health literacy was measured using the questionnaire newly developed by Lee (2007), interpreted as "limited" (score 0 to 16) and "adequate" (score 17 to 25). The data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5 version. Results: The average age of total participant was 77.4 +/- 6.0 yrs and 60.1 % of them were women. Only 34.8 % (n=48) of participants had adequate health literacy. When comparing participants with adequate health literacy, participants with limited health literacy were more likely to be older, female, have lower level of education. Their BP was significantly higher (systolic 133.2 +/- 17.79 mmHg, diastolic 78.55 +/- 9.03 mmHg, p<.05), and they were likely to take more number of antihypertensive medication (1.51 +/- 0.69 pills/day, p<.001) than those with adequate health literacy (systolic 126.4 +/- 14.26mmHg, diastolic 74.34 +/- 8.32 mmHg; 1.17 +/- 0.38 pills/day). However, no difference was found in antihypertensive medication adherence. Health literacy affects BP level of elderly taking antihypertensive agents, but not self-reported medication adherence. Conclusion: Efforts should concentrate on increment of health literacy among elderly taking antihypertensive agents to maintain their adequate BP effectively.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelations among Health Literacy, Medication Adherence, and BP Control in Older Korean Adults Taking Antihypertensive Agentsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156025-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relations among Health Literacy, Medication Adherence, and BP Control in Older Korean Adults Taking Antihypertensive Agents</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Chu, Sang Hui, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Yonsei University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">shchu@yuhs.ac</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hyung Jin Moon, MS, RN; Kwang Suk Kim, PhD, RN; Dong-soo Shin; Tae Wha Lee, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: Limited health literacy is associated with receiving fewer preventive services, difficulty following medication instructions, and with poorer health outcomes. The prevalence of hypertension among elderly in Korea is more than 50%. Yet, little is known about the effect of health literacy on the elderly taking antihypertensive agents in Korea. This study was conducted to evaluate how health literacy relates medication adherence and blood pressure (BP) control among the elderly taking antihypertensive agents. Methods: A face-to-face survey of 138 elderly taking antihypertensive agents aged 65 or older in Seoul was conducted through home visit. Health literacy was measured using the questionnaire newly developed by Lee (2007), interpreted as &quot;limited&quot; (score 0 to 16) and &quot;adequate&quot; (score 17 to 25). The data were analyzed by SPSS 11.5 version. Results: The average age of total participant was 77.4 +/- 6.0 yrs and 60.1 % of them were women. Only 34.8 % (n=48) of participants had adequate health literacy. When comparing participants with adequate health literacy, participants with limited health literacy were more likely to be older, female, have lower level of education. Their BP was significantly higher (systolic 133.2 +/- 17.79 mmHg, diastolic 78.55 +/- 9.03 mmHg, p&lt;.05), and they were likely to take more number of antihypertensive medication (1.51 +/- 0.69 pills/day, p&lt;.001) than those with adequate health literacy (systolic 126.4 +/- 14.26mmHg, diastolic 74.34 +/- 8.32 mmHg; 1.17 +/- 0.38 pills/day). However, no difference was found in antihypertensive medication adherence. Health literacy affects BP level of elderly taking antihypertensive agents, but not self-reported medication adherence. Conclusion: Efforts should concentrate on increment of health literacy among elderly taking antihypertensive agents to maintain their adequate BP effectively.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:22:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:22:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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