2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156032
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Nurse Staffing on Patient Outcomes in Acute Care Hospitals
Abstract:
Effect of Nurse Staffing on Patient Outcomes in Acute Care Hospitals
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Frith, Karen H., PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alabama in Huntsville
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Faye Anderson, DNS; Fan Tseng, PhD; Nancy Gerilyn Hoyt, BSN, MN; Kim Moore, RN, MSN, NEA-BC; Kathleen Sanford, DBA, RN, FACHE; Barbara Caspers, MS, BSN
[Research Presentation] Purpose: People expect error-free care when admitted to hospitals, yet each year preventable injuries and deaths occur (Institute of Medicine, 2000). Nurse staffing is an important aspect in healthcare delivery and should be examined as a factor in patient outcomes. Therefore, the purpose of the research was to determine the predictive relationships between nurse staffing and patient outcomes in hospitals. Two hypotheses were examined: higher nurse staffing is significantly, negatively related to length of stay, adverse events and mortality, controlling for patient factors as covariates; and higher percentages of RNs and LPNs are significantly, negatively related to length of stay, adverse events and mortality, controlling for patient factors as covariates. Methods: A quantitative, cross-sectional method was used, and a sample of 35,000 patients from 11 medical-surgical units was drawn. Data were extracted from administrative databases from a 2-year period. Patient-level and unit-level data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling in HLM 6.06. Results: Findings from the study showed nurse staffing is predictive of patient length of stay (LOS) and adverse events when controlling for patient age and complication index. The predictive model showed that for every 0.6 hour increase in RN hours, there would be a 10.3% decrease in LOS. Likewise, with every 1% increase in the proportion of RNs, there would be a 3% decrease in LOS. Staffing was related to adverse events: for every 1% increase in the proportion of RNs, there was a 3% decrease in adverse events. Mortality was not predicted by nurse staffing. Conclusion: The results of this study, along with others reported in the literature, show evidence of relationships between staffing and patient outcomes. Nurse administrators should consider research findings when making budgeting and staffing decisions.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Nurse Staffing on Patient Outcomes in Acute Care Hospitalsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156032-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Nurse Staffing on Patient Outcomes in Acute Care Hospitals</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Frith, Karen H., PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alabama in Huntsville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karen.frith@uah.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Faye Anderson, DNS; Fan Tseng, PhD; Nancy Gerilyn Hoyt, BSN, MN; Kim Moore, RN, MSN, NEA-BC; Kathleen Sanford, DBA, RN, FACHE; Barbara Caspers, MS, BSN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: People expect error-free care when admitted to hospitals, yet each year preventable injuries and deaths occur (Institute of Medicine, 2000). Nurse staffing is an important aspect in healthcare delivery and should be examined as a factor in patient outcomes. Therefore, the purpose of the research was to determine the predictive relationships between nurse staffing and patient outcomes in hospitals. Two hypotheses were examined: higher nurse staffing is significantly, negatively related to length of stay, adverse events and mortality, controlling for patient factors as covariates; and higher percentages of RNs and LPNs are significantly, negatively related to length of stay, adverse events and mortality, controlling for patient factors as covariates. Methods: A quantitative, cross-sectional method was used, and a sample of 35,000 patients from 11 medical-surgical units was drawn. Data were extracted from administrative databases from a 2-year period. Patient-level and unit-level data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling in HLM 6.06. Results: Findings from the study showed nurse staffing is predictive of patient length of stay (LOS) and adverse events when controlling for patient age and complication index. The predictive model showed that for every 0.6 hour increase in RN hours, there would be a 10.3% decrease in LOS. Likewise, with every 1% increase in the proportion of RNs, there would be a 3% decrease in LOS. Staffing was related to adverse events: for every 1% increase in the proportion of RNs, there was a 3% decrease in adverse events. Mortality was not predicted by nurse staffing. Conclusion: The results of this study, along with others reported in the literature, show evidence of relationships between staffing and patient outcomes. Nurse administrators should consider research findings when making budgeting and staffing decisions.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:23:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:23:22Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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