Conscientiousness and Neuroticism in Nurses: Interactive Effects on Patient-Perceived Care Quality

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156065
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Conscientiousness and Neuroticism in Nurses: Interactive Effects on Patient-Perceived Care Quality
Abstract:
Conscientiousness and Neuroticism in Nurses: Interactive Effects on Patient-Perceived Care Quality
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2009
Author:Teng, Ching-I, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Chang Gung University
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Hsu-Min Tseng, PhD; Tsung-Lan Chu, MS, RN; Tsu-Jung Liu, MS
[Research Presentation] Purpose: Conscientiousness and neuroticism of nurses are known to influence care outcomes. However, the interactive effects of the two traits have not been examined. This study thus investigated conscientiousness and neuroticism in nurses and their effects on patient-perceived care quality. Methods: Items from the Mini-Marker scale were used to measure conscientiousness and neuroticism. The SERVQUAL scale was used to measure patient-perceived care quality. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in eighty-nine units in two medical centers. A total of 313 pairs of nurses and patients were chosen using stratified random sampling. Among them, 98.1% were female, 95.5% were 20-40 years old, and 96.8% had bachelor degrees. Results: Three reliability indices, two convergent validity criteria, two discriminant validity criteria and ten fit indices were applied to confirm adequate measurement quality. The significance of interaction effects was found by regression analysis. The sample was medium split into high-neuroticism and low-neuroticism groups. Conscientiousness was inversely associated with patient-perceived care quality for high-neuroticism nurses (Beta=ü|.20, p<.05) but not for low-neuroticism nurses (Beta=.10, p>.05). Such findings contribute to the field in two respects. First, Teng et al. (2007) only examined the main effects of nurse traits on care quality. The present study further examined the interaction effects. Second, whereas Witt (2002) examined the interactive effects of service provider traits, this study innovatively examined the interactive effects of traits in health professionals. Conclusion: Conscientiousness and neuroticism of nurses have interactive effects on patient-perceived care quality.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConscientiousness and Neuroticism in Nurses: Interactive Effects on Patient-Perceived Care Qualityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156065-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Conscientiousness and Neuroticism in Nurses: Interactive Effects on Patient-Perceived Care Quality</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2009</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Teng, Ching-I, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chang Gung University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chingit@mail.cgu.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hsu-Min Tseng, PhD; Tsung-Lan Chu, MS, RN; Tsu-Jung Liu, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: Conscientiousness and neuroticism of nurses are known to influence care outcomes. However, the interactive effects of the two traits have not been examined. This study thus investigated conscientiousness and neuroticism in nurses and their effects on patient-perceived care quality. Methods: Items from the Mini-Marker scale were used to measure conscientiousness and neuroticism. The SERVQUAL scale was used to measure patient-perceived care quality. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in eighty-nine units in two medical centers. A total of 313 pairs of nurses and patients were chosen using stratified random sampling. Among them, 98.1% were female, 95.5% were 20-40 years old, and 96.8% had bachelor degrees. Results: Three reliability indices, two convergent validity criteria, two discriminant validity criteria and ten fit indices were applied to confirm adequate measurement quality. The significance of interaction effects was found by regression analysis. The sample was medium split into high-neuroticism and low-neuroticism groups. Conscientiousness was inversely associated with patient-perceived care quality for high-neuroticism nurses (Beta=&uuml;|.20, p&lt;.05) but not for low-neuroticism nurses (Beta=.10, p&gt;.05). Such findings contribute to the field in two respects. First, Teng et al. (2007) only examined the main effects of nurse traits on care quality. The present study further examined the interaction effects. Second, whereas Witt (2002) examined the interactive effects of service provider traits, this study innovatively examined the interactive effects of traits in health professionals. Conclusion: Conscientiousness and neuroticism of nurses have interactive effects on patient-perceived care quality.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:25:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:25:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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