Acculturation, Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms among Korean Immigrants in New York City

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156079
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Acculturation, Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms among Korean Immigrants in New York City
Abstract:
Acculturation, Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms among Korean Immigrants in New York City
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Bernstein, Kunsook S., RN, PhD, NP, CASAC
P.I. Institution Name:Hunter College of the City University of New York
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Sunhee Cho, PhD, RN
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: The current study examines the prevalence of depressive symptoms among Korean immigrants in New York City (NYC) and its relation to self-reported discrimination and acculturation.ÿ Methods: A sample of 304 Korean immigrants residing in NYC completed a survey utilizing the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Korean version, Discrimination Scale, and Acculturation Stress Scale. Results: Results indicated that 13.2% of the sample population demonstrated some symptoms of depression and that variables such as living alone, marital status, education, years in US and income impact high depression scores. Results also indicate that higher self-reported exposure to discrimination and lower self-reported language proficiency were related to higher depressive symptoms. In a hierarchical regression analysis, discrimination and English language proficiency were significant predictors of depression, but acculturation stress was not significantly related to depression. Conclusion: This study contributes to a deeper understanding of the relationship between depression, self-reported discrimination and particular sociodemographic factors among Korean immigrants.ÿ The results suggest that health and mental health care practitioners need to be keenly aware of the impact of discrimination on mental health when treating patients from this population.ÿ
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAcculturation, Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms among Korean Immigrants in New York Cityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156079-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Acculturation, Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms among Korean Immigrants in New York City</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bernstein, Kunsook S., RN, PhD, NP, CASAC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Hunter College of the City University of New York</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kbernst@hunter.cuny.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Sunhee Cho, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: The current study examines the prevalence of depressive symptoms among Korean immigrants in New York City (NYC) and its relation to self-reported discrimination and acculturation.&yuml; Methods: A sample of 304 Korean immigrants residing in NYC completed a survey utilizing the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale - Korean version, Discrimination Scale, and Acculturation Stress Scale. Results: Results indicated that 13.2% of the sample population demonstrated some symptoms of depression and that variables such as living alone, marital status, education, years in US and income impact high depression scores. Results also indicate that higher self-reported exposure to discrimination and lower self-reported language proficiency were related to higher depressive symptoms. In a hierarchical regression analysis, discrimination and English language proficiency were significant predictors of depression, but acculturation stress was not significantly related to depression. Conclusion: This study contributes to a deeper understanding of the relationship between depression, self-reported discrimination and particular sociodemographic factors among Korean immigrants.&yuml; The results suggest that health and mental health care practitioners need to be keenly aware of the impact of discrimination on mental health when treating patients from this population.&yuml;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:26:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:26:03Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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