Creating Safer Graduates and Life-Long Learners through the Use of Technology: Usability and Usefulness of Electronic Books (E-Books) Loaded on Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) during Clinical Nursing Courses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156095
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Creating Safer Graduates and Life-Long Learners through the Use of Technology: Usability and Usefulness of Electronic Books (E-Books) Loaded on Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) during Clinical Nursing Courses
Abstract:
Creating Safer Graduates and Life-Long Learners through the Use of Technology: Usability and Usefulness of Electronic Books (E-Books) Loaded on Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) during Clinical Nursing Courses
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Flores, Cecilia "Ceil" M., MSN, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas at Arlington
Title:Clinical Instructor
21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this project was to compare undergraduates' perceptions of clinical usability and usefulness of E-books loaded on a PDA. Technology aptitude and e-learning usage was measured at baseline and 15 months. The availability of accurate and timely nursing and drug information at point-of-care can play a vital role in safe patient management and outcomes. While graduate students have used PDAs, there is little evidence of PDA use among undergraduate BSN students. Methods: A descriptive design was the method used for this evaluation project.ÿ Participants included 94 Junior I nursing students at baseline and 74 respondents post-intervention for a 79% response rate. A 25-item, 7-point Likert and multiple choice investigator developed post questionnaire, assessed usefulness and usability of the e-technology. Results: The overall results, at baseline, 82% of the students thought that the handhelds would be useful in accomplishing clinical tasks more effectively, increasing their productivity and performance. Seventy-eight percent (n=73) of the students were in their 20's (range: 19-58) and most considered e-technology to be easy to use. Of the 71 students who completed follow-up assessments, 97% (n=67) and 92% (n=65) reported the PDAs had given them faster access to pharmacology and IV medication information respectively. At the end of the semester 94% (n=66) found the handhelds were easy to use. All outcomes will be presented. Conclusion: The conclusion and implication for nursing education were PDAs loaded with E-books are a resource for nursing students and supports use of technology at the point-of-care and prepares students for safe practice and the advancing technologies of our changing health care system.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCreating Safer Graduates and Life-Long Learners through the Use of Technology: Usability and Usefulness of Electronic Books (E-Books) Loaded on Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) during Clinical Nursing Coursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156095-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Creating Safer Graduates and Life-Long Learners through the Use of Technology: Usability and Usefulness of Electronic Books (E-Books) Loaded on Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) during Clinical Nursing Courses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flores, Cecilia &quot;Ceil&quot; M., MSN, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas at Arlington</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cflores@uta.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this project was to compare undergraduates' perceptions of clinical usability and usefulness of E-books loaded on a PDA. Technology aptitude and e-learning usage was measured at baseline and 15 months. The availability of accurate and timely nursing and drug information at point-of-care can play a vital role in safe patient management and outcomes. While graduate students have used PDAs, there is little evidence of PDA use among undergraduate BSN students. Methods: A descriptive design was the method used for this evaluation project.&yuml; Participants included 94 Junior I nursing students at baseline and 74 respondents post-intervention for a 79% response rate. A 25-item, 7-point Likert and multiple choice investigator developed post questionnaire, assessed usefulness and usability of the e-technology. Results: The overall results, at baseline, 82% of the students thought that the handhelds would be useful in accomplishing clinical tasks more effectively, increasing their productivity and performance. Seventy-eight percent (n=73) of the students were in their 20's (range: 19-58) and most considered e-technology to be easy to use. Of the 71 students who completed follow-up assessments, 97% (n=67) and 92% (n=65) reported the PDAs had given them faster access to pharmacology and IV medication information respectively. At the end of the semester 94% (n=66) found the handhelds were easy to use. All outcomes will be presented. Conclusion: The conclusion and implication for nursing education were PDAs loaded with E-books are a resource for nursing students and supports use of technology at the point-of-care and prepares students for safe practice and the advancing technologies of our changing health care system.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:26:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:26:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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