2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156097
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Operational Definition of Stable in High-Risk Antepartum Client
Abstract:
Operational Definition of Stable in High-Risk Antepartum Client
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2010
Author:Hall, Susan L., MSN, RNC
P.I. Institution Name:Forsyth Medical Center
Title:Clinical Nurse
21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] The use of Fetal Heart Monitoring (FHM) is an important component of caring for high-risk antenatal clients to assess the physiologic status of the fetus (Collins, 2008). However, FHM has caused much debate in the field of obstetrics, particularly because it is often used in low-risk cases (Blincoe, 2005). FHM is a time-consuming nursing task which requires that an ultrasound Doppler be secured on the pregnant client's abdomen with belts to obtain a fetal heart tracing. It is the nurse's responsibility to maintain a fetal heart tracing at all times and frequently interpret the tracing to validate fetal well-being (Simpson, 2004).Given the complex nature of FHM, it is imperative that appropriate nurse/patient ratios are established for clients on continuous FHM. However, no specific guidelines exist. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist (ACOG), the recommended nurse-to-patient ratio for high-risk obstetric client is 1:3 with complications but in "stable" condition, and 1:6 without complications (Perinatal Care, 2007; Schofield, 2003). Clarification is needed regarding an operational definition of "stable" to effectively apply the ACOG ratio guidelines. In addition, the impact of FHM on nursing time must be factored into ratio determination to ensure adequate monitoring, including troubleshooting and interpretation. The purpose of this study was to determine an operational definition of "stable" as it relates to high-risk Antepartum clients. Using Constructivism as the theoretical framework, a definition of stable was constructed using expert practitioners at FMC, as well as medical literature and professional organizations. The outcomes of this study will provide the Antepartum UCIC with some guidance when determining staffing policies and use of FHM.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOperational Definition of Stable in High-Risk Antepartum Clienten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156097-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Operational Definition of Stable in High-Risk Antepartum Client</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2010</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hall, Susan L., MSN, RNC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Forsyth Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Clinical Nurse</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hallsu@wssu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">21st INRC [Evidence-Based Practice Presentation] The use of Fetal Heart Monitoring (FHM) is an important component of caring for high-risk antenatal clients to assess the physiologic status of the fetus (Collins, 2008). However, FHM has caused much debate in the field of obstetrics, particularly because it is often used in low-risk cases (Blincoe, 2005). FHM is a time-consuming nursing task which requires that an ultrasound Doppler be secured on the pregnant client's abdomen with belts to obtain a fetal heart tracing. It is the nurse's responsibility to maintain a fetal heart tracing at all times and frequently interpret the tracing to validate fetal well-being (Simpson, 2004).Given the complex nature of FHM, it is imperative that appropriate nurse/patient ratios are established for clients on continuous FHM. However, no specific guidelines exist. According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologist (ACOG), the recommended nurse-to-patient ratio for high-risk obstetric client is 1:3 with complications but in &quot;stable&quot; condition, and 1:6 without complications (Perinatal Care, 2007; Schofield, 2003). Clarification is needed regarding an operational definition of &quot;stable&quot; to effectively apply the ACOG ratio guidelines. In addition, the impact of FHM on nursing time must be factored into ratio determination to ensure adequate monitoring, including troubleshooting and interpretation. The purpose of this study was to determine an operational definition of &quot;stable&quot; as it relates to high-risk Antepartum clients. Using Constructivism as the theoretical framework, a definition of stable was constructed using expert practitioners at FMC, as well as medical literature and professional organizations. The outcomes of this study will provide the Antepartum UCIC with some guidance when determining staffing policies and use of FHM.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:27:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:27:05Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.