2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156115
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relating well with Persons with Dementia
Abstract:
Relating well with Persons with Dementia
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:McGilton, Katherine S., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Toronto Rehabilitation Institute
Title:Research Scientist
Co-Authors:Souraya Sidani, PhD; Sepali Guruge, RN, PhD; Veronique Boscart, RN, MScN, MEd, PhD(c) and Maryanne Brown, RN, BScN, MSc
[Research Presentation] The central importance of human interaction in long-term care is a major reason why an important element of quality care involves assessing the quality of the interaction between staff and residents with dementia.áIn previous work, McGilton developed a relational behavior scale that is used to monitor the quality of staffs' ability to relate well with persons with dementia. A descriptive correlational study was conduced to examine staffs' relational behaviors and the residentsÆ affect. The study included observations with 35 staff and 17 residents from 3 facilities. Results indicated that providersÆ relational behavior influenced residents' positive affect and mood during three care-giving situations (morning care, meal time, and interpersonal interaction).áThe effective relational behaviors of the staff were positively correlated with the residents' pleasure during morning care (r = .313, p < .009) and during interpersonal interactions (r = .372, p < .002).á StaffÆs effective relational behaviors during episodes of morning care were negatively correlated with residents' anxiety (r = -.528, p < .000) and sadness (r = -.299, p < .012). During meal times staffs' effective relational behaviors were also negatively correlated with residents' anxiety (r = -.687, p < .000) and sadness (r = -.522, p < .000). Our discussion will focus on an understanding of staffs' ability to relate well with persons with dementia in different care giving situations in everyday practice.á Articulating how relational care can be nurtured in the nursing home setting will help improve quality of care.áá
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelating well with Persons with Dementiaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156115-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relating well with Persons with Dementia</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McGilton, Katherine S., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Toronto Rehabilitation Institute</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mcgilton.kathy@torontorehab.on.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Souraya Sidani, PhD; Sepali Guruge, RN, PhD; Veronique Boscart, RN, MScN, MEd, PhD(c) and Maryanne Brown, RN, BScN, MSc</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] The central importance of human interaction in long-term care is a major reason why an important element of quality care involves assessing the quality of the interaction between staff and residents with dementia.&aacute;In previous work, McGilton developed a relational behavior scale that is used to monitor the quality of staffs' ability to relate well with persons with dementia. A descriptive correlational study was conduced to examine staffs' relational behaviors and the residents&AElig; affect. The study included observations with 35 staff and 17 residents from 3 facilities. Results indicated that providers&AElig; relational behavior influenced residents' positive affect and mood during three care-giving situations (morning care, meal time, and interpersonal interaction).&aacute;The effective relational behaviors of the staff were positively correlated with the residents' pleasure during morning care (r = .313, p &lt; .009) and during interpersonal interactions (r = .372, p &lt; .002).&aacute; Staff&AElig;s effective relational behaviors during episodes of morning care were negatively correlated with residents' anxiety (r = -.528, p &lt; .000) and sadness (r = -.299, p &lt; .012). During meal times staffs' effective relational behaviors were also negatively correlated with residents' anxiety (r = -.687, p &lt; .000) and sadness (r = -.522, p &lt; .000). Our discussion will focus on an understanding of staffs' ability to relate well with persons with dementia in different care giving situations in everyday practice.&aacute; Articulating how relational care can be nurtured in the nursing home setting will help improve quality of care.&aacute;&aacute;</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:28:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:28:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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