Adoptive Families Create Environments for Resilience for Children Adopted from the Former Soviet Union: A Mid-Adolescent Follow-up

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156116
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adoptive Families Create Environments for Resilience for Children Adopted from the Former Soviet Union: A Mid-Adolescent Follow-up
Abstract:
Adoptive Families Create Environments for Resilience for Children Adopted from the Former Soviet Union: A Mid-Adolescent Follow-up
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:McGuinness, Teena M., PhD, APRN, BC
P.I. Institution Name:University of South Alabama
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Janyce G. Dyer, PhD, CRNP and Kristina Schneider
[Research Presentation] Adoptive Families Create Environments for Resilience for Children Adopted from the Former Soviet Union: A Mid-Adolescent Follow-up Objective: To evaluate the impact of family environment on the competence of children adopted from Russia. Design and Sample: A cohort of 105 children adopted by U.S. families has been followed prospectively since 1998. These children have experienced multiple early adversities. At time I (n=105; mean age 7.7 years), risk factors included prenatal alcohol exposure (41%), institutionalization during sensitive developmental periods (100%), and abuse (57%) were described. Concepts and Variables Studied Together: We examined the impact of family environment as a predictor of child academic, social and conduct competence. Methods: Mailings were sent to adoptive families recruited from five adoption agencies in 1997-98 inviting them to participate in an initial study and follow-up study seven years later. Data were collected via telephone and mail survey. Thirty families participated in the follow-up study in mid-adolescence with 25 completing all questionnaires. Findings: Scores on family environment subdomains remained positive and essentially unchanged. At mid-adolescence (n=30; mean age of children, 15.1), outcomes in social and conduct competence had improved but the academic competence measure declined slightly. Many children continue to face academic challenges; 13 children were described by their parents as having reading abilities below grade level and 57% received special services such as speech therapy and supplemental reading, math, and science support. Multiple regression analysis of total competence showed two significant predictors: birth weight and family environment (cohesion), resulting in a significant model fit (R2=.398, adjusted R2=.344). Conclusions: Many children face academic challenges: 56% read below grade level. However, given the positive and supportive family environment, social and conduct competence continues to improve. Implications: Adoptive family environment makes a significant difference in child competence for children adopted from the former USSR.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdoptive Families Create Environments for Resilience for Children Adopted from the Former Soviet Union: A Mid-Adolescent Follow-upen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156116-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adoptive Families Create Environments for Resilience for Children Adopted from the Former Soviet Union: A Mid-Adolescent Follow-up</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McGuinness, Teena M., PhD, APRN, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of South Alabama</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">tmcguinness@usouthal.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Janyce G. Dyer, PhD, CRNP and Kristina Schneider</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Adoptive Families Create Environments for Resilience for Children Adopted from the Former Soviet Union: A Mid-Adolescent Follow-up Objective: To evaluate the impact of family environment on the competence of children adopted from Russia. Design and Sample: A cohort of 105 children adopted by U.S. families has been followed prospectively since 1998. These children have experienced multiple early adversities. At time I (n=105; mean age 7.7 years), risk factors included prenatal alcohol exposure (41%), institutionalization during sensitive developmental periods (100%), and abuse (57%) were described. Concepts and Variables Studied Together: We examined the impact of family environment as a predictor of child academic, social and conduct competence. Methods: Mailings were sent to adoptive families recruited from five adoption agencies in 1997-98 inviting them to participate in an initial study and follow-up study seven years later. Data were collected via telephone and mail survey. Thirty families participated in the follow-up study in mid-adolescence with 25 completing all questionnaires. Findings: Scores on family environment subdomains remained positive and essentially unchanged. At mid-adolescence (n=30; mean age of children, 15.1), outcomes in social and conduct competence had improved but the academic competence measure declined slightly. Many children continue to face academic challenges; 13 children were described by their parents as having reading abilities below grade level and 57% received special services such as speech therapy and supplemental reading, math, and science support. Multiple regression analysis of total competence showed two significant predictors: birth weight and family environment (cohesion), resulting in a significant model fit (R2=.398, adjusted R2=.344). Conclusions: Many children face academic challenges: 56% read below grade level. However, given the positive and supportive family environment, social and conduct competence continues to improve. Implications: Adoptive family environment makes a significant difference in child competence for children adopted from the former USSR.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:28:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:28:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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