2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156123
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nursing Education: Evolution or Revolution?
Abstract:
Nursing Education: Evolution or Revolution?
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Myrick, Florence, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Alberta
Title:Associate Professor
Co-Authors:Deborah Tamlyn, RN, PhD
[Research Presentation] In recent years, a trend in nursing education has been a move away from the behaviorist models. Instead, the trend has been toward models that would promote the democratization of the teaching learning process, empower students, contribute to the development and enhancement of their critical thinking ability, reconstruct nursing practice, foster excellence in patient care, and mitigate the widening theory practice gap. Democratization or emancipation of the teaching learning process would thus reflect an approach that would respect students in their search for knowledge. With the curriculum revolution of the 1990's a whole new world would emerge. But what then of that world? In reality how has nursing curricula evolved? Is the teaching learning process of today revolutionary or does it continue to be reminiscent of times past. In this presentation the authors explore the notion of emancipatory education, discuss the current practices that contribute to such an approach to the teaching learning process, and examine the subtle incongruities and complexities between teacher intentions and their practice.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNursing Education: Evolution or Revolution?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156123-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Nursing Education: Evolution or Revolution?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Myrick, Florence, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Alberta</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">flo.myrick@ualberta.ca</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Deborah Tamlyn, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] In recent years, a trend in nursing education has been a move away from the behaviorist models. Instead, the trend has been toward models that would promote the democratization of the teaching learning process, empower students, contribute to the development and enhancement of their critical thinking ability, reconstruct nursing practice, foster excellence in patient care, and mitigate the widening theory practice gap. Democratization or emancipation of the teaching learning process would thus reflect an approach that would respect students in their search for knowledge. With the curriculum revolution of the 1990's a whole new world would emerge. But what then of that world? In reality how has nursing curricula evolved? Is the teaching learning process of today revolutionary or does it continue to be reminiscent of times past. In this presentation the authors explore the notion of emancipatory education, discuss the current practices that contribute to such an approach to the teaching learning process, and examine the subtle incongruities and complexities between teacher intentions and their practice.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:28:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:28:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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