The Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter-Initial Reliability and Validity Evaluation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156127
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter-Initial Reliability and Validity Evaluation
Abstract:
The Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter-Initial Reliability and Validity Evaluation
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Pearce, Patricia Flannery, MPH, PhD, APRN-FNP
P.I. Institution Name:University of Utah
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Justine J. Reel, PhD, NCC and Jacquelyn Williamson, MS
[Research Presentation] Background: Assessing children's physical activity through informal questions or self-report tools in clinical practice and research requires use of developmentally-appropriate language that children readily understand to support their reporting. The Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter (C-CPAR) is a computerized self-report physical activity questionnaire designed with children, based on a qualitative study exploring children's understanding of physical activity and their reporting preferences and needs. Purpose:áTo evaluate test-retest reliability, concurrent validity, and usability of the C-CPAR. Methods: A convenience sample of 31 children (mean age=12, sd=1.3; Hispanic n=23, African-American n=3, and 1 each American Indian, Asian, Caucasian, Pacific Islander, other) enrolled in a sports camp with scheduled activities participated. Each child completed 24-hour activity recalls on two consecutive days while simultaneously wearing a pedometer. Results: A strong correlation (r = 0.76, p=0.0002) was demonstrated between MET-minutes (activity duration x metabolic equivalent for the activity) from the 2-day reports. Comparing scheduled and reported activities, there were no significant differences between number of activities reported (m=5.38 day1, 5.27 day2; t= 0.29), minutes in activity (m=240 day 1, 263 day2, t= -.129), and total MET-minutes (m=954, day1, 958 day2, t=-0.3). Significant correlations (r=0.66, p<.01 Day 1; r=0.37, p<.01 Day 2) between average metabolic equivalents for scheduled activities (m=4.19) and C-CPAR-reported activities were demonstrated. Activity reports with pedometer counts comparisons were non-significant (r=0.33). Usability issues included language difficulties and computer inexperience, but with attention from research team personnel, those children had no difficulty completing the questionnaire. Implications: Adequate reliability and concurrent validity were demonstrated in a small, ethnically diverse sample. Participants had little difficulty using the C-CPAR, but a Spanish language option would be useful. Potentially the C-CPAR may be useful as a screening questionnaire for clinical practice, or in research. Developmentally-appropriate measurement tools may facilitate measurement techniques upon which appropriate interventions can be based.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter-Initial Reliability and Validity Evaluationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156127-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter-Initial Reliability and Validity Evaluation</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Pearce, Patricia Flannery, MPH, PhD, APRN-FNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Utah</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Patricia.Pearce@nurs.utah.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Justine J. Reel, PhD, NCC and Jacquelyn Williamson, MS</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Background: Assessing children's physical activity through informal questions or self-report tools in clinical practice and research requires use of developmentally-appropriate language that children readily understand to support their reporting. The Children's Computerized Physical Activity Reporter (C-CPAR) is a computerized self-report physical activity questionnaire designed with children, based on a qualitative study exploring children's understanding of physical activity and their reporting preferences and needs. Purpose:&aacute;To evaluate test-retest reliability, concurrent validity, and usability of the C-CPAR. Methods: A convenience sample of 31 children (mean age=12, sd=1.3; Hispanic n=23, African-American n=3, and 1 each American Indian, Asian, Caucasian, Pacific Islander, other) enrolled in a sports camp with scheduled activities participated. Each child completed 24-hour activity recalls on two consecutive days while simultaneously wearing a pedometer. Results: A strong correlation (r = 0.76, p=0.0002) was demonstrated between MET-minutes (activity duration x metabolic equivalent for the activity) from the 2-day reports. Comparing scheduled and reported activities, there were no significant differences between number of activities reported (m=5.38 day1, 5.27 day2; t= 0.29), minutes in activity (m=240 day 1, 263 day2, t= -.129), and total MET-minutes (m=954, day1, 958 day2, t=-0.3). Significant correlations (r=0.66, p&lt;.01 Day 1; r=0.37, p&lt;.01 Day 2) between average metabolic equivalents for scheduled activities (m=4.19) and C-CPAR-reported activities were demonstrated. Activity reports with pedometer counts comparisons were non-significant (r=0.33). Usability issues included language difficulties and computer inexperience, but with attention from research team personnel, those children had no difficulty completing the questionnaire. Implications: Adequate reliability and concurrent validity were demonstrated in a small, ethnically diverse sample. Participants had little difficulty using the C-CPAR, but a Spanish language option would be useful. Potentially the C-CPAR may be useful as a screening questionnaire for clinical practice, or in research. Developmentally-appropriate measurement tools may facilitate measurement techniques upon which appropriate interventions can be based.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:28:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:28:48Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.