The Pattern of Relationship between Knowledge and Self-care with Blood Pressure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156129
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Pattern of Relationship between Knowledge and Self-care with Blood Pressure
Abstract:
The Pattern of Relationship between Knowledge and Self-care with Blood Pressure
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Peters, Rosalind, RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University College of Nursing
Title:assistant professor of nursing
Co-Authors:Thomas Templin, PhD
[Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the level of knowledge and BP self-care practices among community-dwelling African Americans. Measures: Two investigator-developed instruments were used: BP Knowledge and BP Self Care. Both measures were evaluated using both scale and confirmatory factor analysis. High internal consistency was found (alpha=.91 for BP Knowledge Scale and .78 for the BP Self-care scale). Validity was established by correlation between the two scales r=.31, p<.001. BP was measured using an Omron professional automated machine. Sample: 306 participants were conveniently recruited from multiple sites in an urban area. Participants were well distributed by gender (47% men; 53% women); age (range 21-65, M=44.42 +/- 12.41); education (range 4-20 years; M=12.92 +/- 2.35); and 115 participants (38%) had a known history of hypertension. Results: Knowledge of behaviors necessary to control BP averaged 5.8 (+/- 1.28) on a 7-point scale; BP self care behaviors averaged 4.46 (+/- 1.17) on 7-point scale. Persons with a known history of hypertension had significantly higher knowledge about BP control behaviors (t(302)=2.58, p=.012) and higher level of engaging in BP self care (t(303)=4.25, p<.000). There was an inverse relationship between BP self-care and recorded BP in persons with known history of hypertension, but a positive relationship in persons with no history. Hypertensive participants who engaged in high levels of BP self-care averaged 5.41 mmHg lower systolic and 3.86 lower diastolic BP. Conclusions: The hypothesized relationship that increased self-care is associated with decreased BP is only found in persons with a known history of hypertension. The reverse pattern is noted in persons with no history (increased BP is associated with increased self-care) suggesting the importance of knowledge of health status as information needed by persons to engage in health promoting self-care. This study was supported by NINR (1 R15 NR008489-01)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Pattern of Relationship between Knowledge and Self-care with Blood Pressureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156129-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Pattern of Relationship between Knowledge and Self-care with Blood Pressure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peters, Rosalind, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">assistant professor of nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rpeters@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Thomas Templin, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Presentation] Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the level of knowledge and BP self-care practices among community-dwelling African Americans. Measures: Two investigator-developed instruments were used: BP Knowledge and BP Self Care. Both measures were evaluated using both scale and confirmatory factor analysis. High internal consistency was found (alpha=.91 for BP Knowledge Scale and .78 for the BP Self-care scale). Validity was established by correlation between the two scales r=.31, p&lt;.001. BP was measured using an Omron professional automated machine. Sample: 306 participants were conveniently recruited from multiple sites in an urban area. Participants were well distributed by gender (47% men; 53% women); age (range 21-65, M=44.42 +/- 12.41); education (range 4-20 years; M=12.92 +/- 2.35); and 115 participants (38%) had a known history of hypertension. Results: Knowledge of behaviors necessary to control BP averaged 5.8 (+/- 1.28) on a 7-point scale; BP self care behaviors averaged 4.46 (+/- 1.17) on 7-point scale. Persons with a known history of hypertension had significantly higher knowledge about BP control behaviors (t(302)=2.58, p=.012) and higher level of engaging in BP self care (t(303)=4.25, p&lt;.000). There was an inverse relationship between BP self-care and recorded BP in persons with known history of hypertension, but a positive relationship in persons with no history. Hypertensive participants who engaged in high levels of BP self-care averaged 5.41 mmHg lower systolic and 3.86 lower diastolic BP. Conclusions: The hypothesized relationship that increased self-care is associated with decreased BP is only found in persons with a known history of hypertension. The reverse pattern is noted in persons with no history (increased BP is associated with increased self-care) suggesting the importance of knowledge of health status as information needed by persons to engage in health promoting self-care. This study was supported by NINR (1 R15 NR008489-01)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:28:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:28:54Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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