Lessons learned about Evidence-Based Practice and standardized NNN language when Promoting Family Integrity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156157
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Lessons learned about Evidence-Based Practice and standardized NNN language when Promoting Family Integrity
Abstract:
Lessons learned about Evidence-Based Practice and standardized NNN language when Promoting Family Integrity
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2007
Author:Van Horn, Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CCRN
P.I. Institution Name:The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Donald D. Kautz, PhD, RN, CNRN, CRRN-A
[Evidence-based Presentation] The adoption of standardized nursing language (referred to as NNN language) and the adoption of evidenced-based practice (EBP) are two independently occurring trends in nursing schools and clinical institutions. The authors will examine the implications of combining NNN language and EBP when working with the families of adult patients in acute care settings. NNN language includes Nursing Diagnosis (NANDA), Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC) and Nursing Outcomes Classifications (NOC). EBP includes determining the level of evidence for specific nursing interventions and the development of guidelines for practice. Many of these guidelines are available through the AHRQ website, www.guideline.gov. The authors examined published nursing studies from 2001 to present to determine the level of evidence for the specific activities (nursing interventions) of the NIC ôFamily Integrity Promotion." Using an adapted version of Melnyk and Fineout-Overholt's (2004) scale, the authors determined there are Level I and II evidence for some activities, other activities are "standards of practice," and other activities were determined priority areas for future research. Level I and II evidence, comprising one or more randomized controlled trials, exists for interventions related to promoting family communication and coping skills, supporting family relationships, facilitating families to participate in patient care, and referral to family support groups and therapy. Additional interventions classified as "standards of practice," include strategies that are strongly recommended based on expert opinion, descriptive findings, and standards of care. Examples included establishing trust, providing privacy, and listening to families. However, these interventions cannot be tested in randomized controlled trials because of ethical and practical considerations. Implications for this limitation when adopting EBP will be discussed. The authors will also outline strategies for testing the NICs "Guilt Work Facilitation," "Anger Control Assistance," and "Hope Instillation" when working with families. Finally, the impact of NNN language on guideline development will be explored.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLessons learned about Evidence-Based Practice and standardized NNN language when Promoting Family Integrityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156157-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Lessons learned about Evidence-Based Practice and standardized NNN language when Promoting Family Integrity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2007</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Van Horn, Elizabeth, PhD, RN, CCRN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of North Carolina at Greensboro</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">e_vanhorn@uncg.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Donald D. Kautz, PhD, RN, CNRN, CRRN-A</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Evidence-based Presentation] The adoption of standardized nursing language (referred to as NNN language) and the adoption of evidenced-based practice (EBP) are two independently occurring trends in nursing schools and clinical institutions. The authors will examine the implications of combining NNN language and EBP when working with the families of adult patients in acute care settings. NNN language includes Nursing Diagnosis (NANDA), Nursing Interventions Classifications (NIC) and Nursing Outcomes Classifications (NOC). EBP includes determining the level of evidence for specific nursing interventions and the development of guidelines for practice. Many of these guidelines are available through the AHRQ website, www.guideline.gov. The authors examined published nursing studies from 2001 to present to determine the level of evidence for the specific activities (nursing interventions) of the NIC &ocirc;Family Integrity Promotion.&quot; Using an adapted version of Melnyk and Fineout-Overholt's (2004) scale, the authors determined there are Level I and II evidence for some activities, other activities are &quot;standards of practice,&quot; and other activities were determined priority areas for future research. Level I and II evidence, comprising one or more randomized controlled trials, exists for interventions related to promoting family communication and coping skills, supporting family relationships, facilitating families to participate in patient care, and referral to family support groups and therapy. Additional interventions classified as &quot;standards of practice,&quot; include strategies that are strongly recommended based on expert opinion, descriptive findings, and standards of care. Examples included establishing trust, providing privacy, and listening to families. However, these interventions cannot be tested in randomized controlled trials because of ethical and practical considerations. Implications for this limitation when adopting EBP will be discussed. The authors will also outline strategies for testing the NICs &quot;Guilt Work Facilitation,&quot; &quot;Anger Control Assistance,&quot; and &quot;Hope Instillation&quot; when working with families. Finally, the impact of NNN language on guideline development will be explored.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:30:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:30:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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