Using Simulation to Promote Team-Based Disclosure of Errors: Implications for Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156200
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Simulation to Promote Team-Based Disclosure of Errors: Implications for Practice
Abstract:
Using Simulation to Promote Team-Based Disclosure of Errors: Implications for Practice
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Espin, Sherry, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Ryerson University
Title:Associate Professor
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Disclosure is a collaborative effort where the healthcare team must communicate effectively, address issues of blame and responsibility, reconcile conflicting perspectives about what happened, and decide whether and how to disclose to the patient. Few healthcare providers or coaches have had disclosure training and may be unprepared for having these difficult conversations with each other and with patients. Prior research suggests wide variation exists in how physicians approach disclosure. In addition, nurses want to be involved in discussing how errors will be disclosed to patients and often want to participate in the actual disclosure. In this context, a study was undertaken to explore the experiences and perceptions associated with an educational simulation intervention for team-based disclosure of errors. This presentation crosses the strategies to promote teaching-learning about the broad use of technology and promoting the integration of technology into evidence-based practice streams of the conference by providing the results of the qualitative grounded theory study. In addition, to grounded theory analytical techniques, linguistic pragmatic analysis was conducted on oral discourse contained in simulation recordings. To ensure applicability and transferability threats were minimized to enhance the methodological rigor, with verification strategies. Project participants included 12 physicians/surgeons and 12 nurses from the OR/Medicine and 3 disclosure coaches at two urban hospitals and one urban community hospital. Key themes around the experiences, perceptions and observed behaviours associated with the training of the standardized patients/team members will be presented. Implication from this research study include a) establishment a group of practitioners who could support the process of facilitating communication strategies for interdisciplinary disclosure of errors to patients; b) the development of simulation scenarios, and the training of coaches for debriefing of team members that could be transferable within and across other health care settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Simulation to Promote Team-Based Disclosure of Errors: Implications for Practiceen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156200-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Simulation to Promote Team-Based Disclosure of Errors: Implications for Practice</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Espin, Sherry, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ryerson University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sespin@ryerson.ca</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Disclosure is a collaborative effort where the healthcare team must communicate effectively, address issues of blame and responsibility, reconcile conflicting perspectives about what happened, and decide whether and how to disclose to the patient. Few healthcare providers or coaches have had disclosure training and may be unprepared for having these difficult conversations with each other and with patients. Prior research suggests wide variation exists in how physicians approach disclosure. In addition, nurses want to be involved in discussing how errors will be disclosed to patients and often want to participate in the actual disclosure. In this context, a study was undertaken to explore the experiences and perceptions associated with an educational simulation intervention for team-based disclosure of errors. This presentation crosses the strategies to promote teaching-learning about the broad use of technology and promoting the integration of technology into evidence-based practice streams of the conference by providing the results of the qualitative grounded theory study. In addition, to grounded theory analytical techniques, linguistic pragmatic analysis was conducted on oral discourse contained in simulation recordings. To ensure applicability and transferability threats were minimized to enhance the methodological rigor, with verification strategies. Project participants included 12 physicians/surgeons and 12 nurses from the OR/Medicine and 3 disclosure coaches at two urban hospitals and one urban community hospital. Key themes around the experiences, perceptions and observed behaviours associated with the training of the standardized patients/team members will be presented. Implication from this research study include a) establishment a group of practitioners who could support the process of facilitating communication strategies for interdisciplinary disclosure of errors to patients; b) the development of simulation scenarios, and the training of coaches for debriefing of team members that could be transferable within and across other health care settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:33:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:33:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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