Meaning of Family Caregiving and its Impact on Adaptation in Taiwanese Families of Individuals with Mental Illness

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156210
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Meaning of Family Caregiving and its Impact on Adaptation in Taiwanese Families of Individuals with Mental Illness
Abstract:
Meaning of Family Caregiving and its Impact on Adaptation in Taiwanese Families of Individuals with Mental Illness
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Title:Student
Co-Authors:Marcia Van Riper, PhD, RN
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Caregiving for a family member with a mental illness can be a challenging experience. In addition to dealing with disease related demands such as unpredictable recurrences, caregivers of individuals with mental illness often have to deal with other demands such as the presence of other dependent family members. One factor that may play a critical role in how family caregivers of individuals with mental illness respond to the caregiving experience is the meaning they attribute to this experience. That is, if they view the caregiving experience as a source of gratification and fulfillment, they may effectively adapt to the increased demands associated with caring for a family member with mental illness. In contrast, if they view the caregiving experience as onerous and overwhelming, they may have difficulty adapting to it The purpose of this cross-sectional study, guided by the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation, was to examine the relationship between meaning of family caregiving and family adaptation (i.e., depressive symptoms of family members, family caregiver burden, and family functioning) in Taiwanese families of individuals with mental illness. The sample of 84 families of individuals with psychiatric genetic conditions (i.e., bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and major depressive disorder) were recruited from two outpatient psychiatric clinics in Taiwan. Family members completed a packet of self-report measures developed to assess meaning of family caregiving, depressive symptoms, family caregiver burden, and family functioning. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, principal component analysis, and mixed linear modeling. Findings of this study suggest that when family members interpret the caregiving experience more positively, they adapt better. These findings highlight the need to develop culturally sensitive interventions designed to help family members interpret the caregiving experience in a more positive manner, which in turn, can optimize individual and family adaptation.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMeaning of Family Caregiving and its Impact on Adaptation in Taiwanese Families of Individuals with Mental Illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156210-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Meaning of Family Caregiving and its Impact on Adaptation in Taiwanese Families of Individuals with Mental Illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Student</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">chsiao@email.unc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Marcia Van Riper, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Caregiving for a family member with a mental illness can be a challenging experience. In addition to dealing with disease related demands such as unpredictable recurrences, caregivers of individuals with mental illness often have to deal with other demands such as the presence of other dependent family members. One factor that may play a critical role in how family caregivers of individuals with mental illness respond to the caregiving experience is the meaning they attribute to this experience. That is, if they view the caregiving experience as a source of gratification and fulfillment, they may effectively adapt to the increased demands associated with caring for a family member with mental illness. In contrast, if they view the caregiving experience as onerous and overwhelming, they may have difficulty adapting to it The purpose of this cross-sectional study, guided by the Resiliency Model of Family Stress, Adjustment, and Adaptation, was to examine the relationship between meaning of family caregiving and family adaptation (i.e., depressive symptoms of family members, family caregiver burden, and family functioning) in Taiwanese families of individuals with mental illness. The sample of 84 families of individuals with psychiatric genetic conditions (i.e., bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and major depressive disorder) were recruited from two outpatient psychiatric clinics in Taiwan. Family members completed a packet of self-report measures developed to assess meaning of family caregiving, depressive symptoms, family caregiver burden, and family functioning. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, principal component analysis, and mixed linear modeling. Findings of this study suggest that when family members interpret the caregiving experience more positively, they adapt better. These findings highlight the need to develop culturally sensitive interventions designed to help family members interpret the caregiving experience in a more positive manner, which in turn, can optimize individual and family adaptation.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:33:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:33:42Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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