School-Based Screening for Overweight, Central Adiposity and Hypertension: Evidence of a Growing Epidemic

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156226
Type:
Presentation
Title:
School-Based Screening for Overweight, Central Adiposity and Hypertension: Evidence of a Growing Epidemic
Abstract:
School-Based Screening for Overweight, Central Adiposity and Hypertension: Evidence of a Growing Epidemic
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2008
Author:Meininger, Janet C., PhD, RN, FAAN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Health Science Center
Title:Jamail Distinguished Professor
Co-Authors:Christine A. Brosnan, DrPH, RN; Mona A. Eissa, PhD, MD; Thong Q. Nguyen, MS; Melinda Phillips, BSN, RN; Lisa R. Reyes, PhD, RN, FNP; Sharon Sterchy, EdD; Sandra L. Upchurch, PhD, RN
[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Obesity (overweight) in children is a significant concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of overweight, at risk of overweight, central adiposity and hypertension in a target population of children in kindergarten through 6th grade in the United States (US). A cross-sectional prevalence survey was conducted with a stratified (by grade level) random sample of homerooms in each of three schools in an urban school district in southeastern Texas. A total of 1070 children (92% response) participated; 67% were Hispanic, 26% were African American. Measurements included body mass index (BMI), central adiposity (waist circumference, waist/height ratio), screening systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (BP), and hypertension identified by measurements on three separate occasions (final BP status). As part of their community health clinical course, BSN students were trained in data collection. Using national standards for BMI by age and gender, 28.7% of the children were overweight (>/= 95th percentile) and 17.9% were at risk of overweight (>/= 85th and < 95th percentile). We found 1.5% of the children underweight. Differences in overweight by gender, ethnic/racial group and grade level were statistically nonsignificant. For central adiposity, 28.8% had a waist circumference >/= 90th percentile and 44.2% had a waist/height ratio >/= 0.5. The percentage with elevated SBP and DBP at screening was 35.9%; after measurement on three occasions, 9.4% remained hypertensive or pre-hypertensive (>/= 90th percentile). Overweight children compared with those < 85th percentile were 4.8 (95% confidence interval, 3.0 û 7.8) times more likely to have final BP status >/= 90th percentile. The results indicate a high prevalence of excess BMI and related risk factors in this population of children. Findings will be discussed in comparison with estimates for children in other studies in the US and worldwide.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSchool-Based Screening for Overweight, Central Adiposity and Hypertension: Evidence of a Growing Epidemicen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156226-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">School-Based Screening for Overweight, Central Adiposity and Hypertension: Evidence of a Growing Epidemic</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2008</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Meininger, Janet C., PhD, RN, FAAN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Health Science Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Jamail Distinguished Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">Janet.C.Meininger@uth.tmc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Christine A. Brosnan, DrPH, RN; Mona A. Eissa, PhD, MD; Thong Q. Nguyen, MS; Melinda Phillips, BSN, RN; Lisa R. Reyes, PhD, RN, FNP; Sharon Sterchy, EdD; Sandra L. Upchurch, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">[Research Paper or Poster Presentation] Obesity (overweight) in children is a significant concern worldwide. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of overweight, at risk of overweight, central adiposity and hypertension in a target population of children in kindergarten through 6th grade in the United States (US). A cross-sectional prevalence survey was conducted with a stratified (by grade level) random sample of homerooms in each of three schools in an urban school district in southeastern Texas. A total of 1070 children (92% response) participated; 67% were Hispanic, 26% were African American. Measurements included body mass index (BMI), central adiposity (waist circumference, waist/height ratio), screening systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (BP), and hypertension identified by measurements on three separate occasions (final BP status). As part of their community health clinical course, BSN students were trained in data collection. Using national standards for BMI by age and gender, 28.7% of the children were overweight (&gt;/= 95th percentile) and 17.9% were at risk of overweight (&gt;/= 85th and &lt; 95th percentile). We found 1.5% of the children underweight. Differences in overweight by gender, ethnic/racial group and grade level were statistically nonsignificant. For central adiposity, 28.8% had a waist circumference &gt;/= 90th percentile and 44.2% had a waist/height ratio &gt;/= 0.5. The percentage with elevated SBP and DBP at screening was 35.9%; after measurement on three occasions, 9.4% remained hypertensive or pre-hypertensive (&gt;/= 90th percentile). Overweight children compared with those &lt; 85th percentile were 4.8 (95% confidence interval, 3.0 &ucirc; 7.8) times more likely to have final BP status &gt;/= 90th percentile. The results indicate a high prevalence of excess BMI and related risk factors in this population of children. Findings will be discussed in comparison with estimates for children in other studies in the US and worldwide.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:34:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:34:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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