Cognitive Function of Diabetes Mellitus 2 Mexican Patients in Comparison to Non-Diabetic

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156251
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Function of Diabetes Mellitus 2 Mexican Patients in Comparison to Non-Diabetic
Abstract:
Cognitive Function of Diabetes Mellitus 2 Mexican Patients in Comparison to Non-Diabetic
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Salazar, Bertha Cecilia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Nursing College, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon
Co-Authors:Esther C. Gallegos, PhD; Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN; Bonnie L. Metzger, RN, PhD, FAAN
Diabetic patients often receive training to manage their diabetes, but still remain hyperglycemic. The abilities to learn, problem solving, and decision making are critical aspects of the self-care of patients with diabetes. Attention and memory are some underlying abilities. Various authors have reported that cognitive functions are altered by abnormal levels of glucose due to DM2. A possible explanation for the bad self-care may be the hyperglycemia. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the cognitive performance of two groups matched by age, gender, and education; one of diabetic and the other of healthy participants. The Mini-mental State Examination was used as screening test. Three cognitive tests were applied to 80 subjects (40 with DM2; 40 healthy): (a) Digit Span Forward (DSF)-Backward (DSB); (b) Trail Making parts A and B (TMT); and (c) The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The main analysis was performed using a Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, controlling for gender, years of school, and age. The results showed differences on DSF (Z = -2.31, p .021), TMT (Z = -1.92, p .055) and the Learning to Learn category of the WCST (Z = -3.05, p .002). Healthy participants showed better performance. Within the DM2 group, years of having been diagnosed was correlated to DSB (rs = -.337, p = .031); and to TMT (rs = -.508, p .001), and Learning to learn (rs -.328, p = .041). Also the age was correlated to DSF (rs  = -398, p = .01), and to TMT (rs = - .605, p = < .001), and to Learning to learn (rs = -.420, p = .008). Patients with diabetes mellitus 2 showed less ability to learn, in comparison to non diabetic participants, suggesting they require creative and thoughtful nursing educational interventions directed to their self-care.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Function of Diabetes Mellitus 2 Mexican Patients in Comparison to Non-Diabeticen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156251-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Function of Diabetes Mellitus 2 Mexican Patients in Comparison to Non-Diabetic</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Salazar, Bertha Cecilia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Nursing College, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bsalazar@ccr.dsi.uanl.mx</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Esther C. Gallegos, PhD; Barbara Therrien, PhD, RN, FAAN; Bonnie L. Metzger, RN, PhD, FAAN</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Diabetic patients often receive training to manage their diabetes, but still remain hyperglycemic. The abilities to learn, problem solving, and&nbsp;decision making are critical aspects of the self-care of&nbsp;patients with diabetes. Attention and memory are some underlying abilities. Various authors have reported that cognitive functions are altered by abnormal levels of glucose due to DM2. A possible explanation for the bad self-care may be the hyperglycemia. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the cognitive performance of two groups matched by age, gender, and education; one of diabetic and the other of&nbsp;healthy&nbsp;participants. The Mini-mental State Examination was used as screening test. Three cognitive tests were applied to 80 subjects (40 with DM2; 40 healthy): (a) Digit Span Forward (DSF)-Backward (DSB); (b) Trail Making parts A and B (TMT); and (c) The Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). The main analysis was performed using a Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test, controlling for gender, years of school,&nbsp;and age. The results showed differences on DSF (Z = -2.31, p .021),&nbsp;TMT (Z = -1.92, p .055) and the Learning to Learn category of the WCST (Z = -3.05, p .002). Healthy participants showed better performance. Within the DM2 group, years of having been diagnosed&nbsp;was correlated to&nbsp;DSB (rs = -.337, p = .031); and to TMT (rs = -.508, p .001), and Learning to learn (rs -.328, p = .041). Also the&nbsp;age&nbsp;was correlated to DSF (rs&nbsp; = -398, p = .01), and to TMT (rs = - .605, p = &lt; .001), and to Learning to learn (rs = -.420, p = .008). Patients with diabetes mellitus 2 showed less ability to learn, in comparison to non diabetic participants, suggesting they require creative and thoughtful nursing educational interventions directed to their self-care.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:36:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:36:04Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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