A Grounded Theory Study of Nurse Family Members Experiences During the Critical Illness of a Loved One

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156252
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A Grounded Theory Study of Nurse Family Members Experiences During the Critical Illness of a Loved One
Abstract:
A Grounded Theory Study of Nurse Family Members Experiences During the Critical Illness of a Loved One
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Salmond, Susan W., EdD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:U. Medicine & Dentistry of New Jersey
Title:Associate Dean
Purpose: To explore the experience of being a nurse family member of a relative hospitalized for a critical illness. Background: A comparison of the investigators personal experience with hospitalization of a critically ill relative and documented research findings showed differences in perceived needs and roles. Review of the literature revealed no data based literature of nurse family members. Methods: A retrospective grounded theory approach was used. Through theoretical, snowball sampling, a diverse sample of 22 nurse informants was obtained for in-depth interviews. Additionally 86 mini-interviews contributed to the data. Constant comparative analysis was used and data collected until no new categorical data emerged. A theoretical framework for adapting family care when the family member is a nurse was inductively drawn from the data. Results: The overarching theme of the study was that the nurse self cannot be separated from the family self. Five processes of negotiation were identified (nurse self responds, let me in, building relationships with, collaborating with, and feeling confidence and trust) as nurse family members masked their emotional response, were placed ?in-charge? by other family, monitored and protected the patient, sought information and meaning, advocated for their loved one and if all other conditions were met, assumed family and self roles. Conclusions and Implications: Nurse family members (NFMs) assume different roles than typical family members which may upset the normal nurse-family power balance. NFMs need to be considered an integral part of the team and this requires flexible visiting hours, detailed information and explanations that bring clarity to data, acceptance of surveillance data from the NFM and partnering with the NFM for advocacy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA Grounded Theory Study of Nurse Family Members Experiences During the Critical Illness of a Loved Oneen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156252-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">A Grounded Theory Study of Nurse Family Members Experiences During the Critical Illness of a Loved One</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Salmond, Susan W., EdD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">U. Medicine &amp; Dentistry of New Jersey</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Dean</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">salmonsu@umdnj.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: To explore the experience of being a nurse family member of a relative hospitalized for a critical illness. Background: A comparison of the investigators personal experience with hospitalization of a critically ill relative and documented research findings showed differences in perceived needs and roles. Review of the literature revealed no data based literature of nurse family members. Methods: A retrospective grounded theory approach was used. Through theoretical, snowball sampling, a diverse sample of 22 nurse informants was obtained for in-depth interviews. Additionally 86 mini-interviews contributed to the data. Constant comparative analysis was used and data collected until no new categorical data emerged. A theoretical framework for adapting family care when the family member is a nurse was inductively drawn from the data. Results: The overarching theme of the study was that the nurse self cannot be separated from the family self. Five processes of negotiation were identified (nurse self responds, let me in, building relationships with, collaborating with, and feeling confidence and trust) as nurse family members masked their emotional response, were placed ?in-charge? by other family, monitored and protected the patient, sought information and meaning, advocated for their loved one and if all other conditions were met, assumed family and self roles. Conclusions and Implications: Nurse family members (NFMs) assume different roles than typical family members which may upset the normal nurse-family power balance. NFMs need to be considered an integral part of the team and this requires flexible visiting hours, detailed information and explanations that bring clarity to data, acceptance of surveillance data from the NFM and partnering with the NFM for advocacy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:36:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:36:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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