2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156253
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Monitoring Delirium in the Hospitalized Elderly
Abstract:
Monitoring Delirium in the Hospitalized Elderly
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Sandhaus, Sonia, MS, RN, CRNP
P.I. Institution Name:Moses Taylor Hospital
Title:Nurse Practitioner
Co-Authors:Margarete Lieb Zalon, PhD, RN, APRN, BC; Faith Harrell, ; Donna Valenti, RNC
Background Delirium is a complex problem in the hospitalized elderly that is associated with increased mortality. Research has demonstrated that a program using volunteers, the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP), is effective in reducing the incidence of delirium in the hospitalized elderly (Inouye, et al., 1999).  The translation of research findings by implementing a HELP program presents a challenge for community hospitals with limited resources.  Furthermore, once such a program is started, it is difficult to determine which outcomes might be directly associated with the intervention. The purpose is to illustrate the evaluation of health outcomes when monitoring the hospitalized elderly for delirium. Specifically, a marker for delirium, intravenous haloperidol and lorazepam use, in relation to patient enrollment in the HELP program will be used to illustrate the complexities of systematic outcome evaluation. Procedures Patients aged 70 years and older are enrolled into the HELP program upon nurse or physician request.  The HELP program consists of skilled interdisciplinary staff with geriatric expertise and trained volunteers who carry out interventions addressing special needs of older adults. Volunteers perform therapeutic activities which include communication/comfort, relaxation, meal assistance and recreation. This will be a retrospective analysis of parenteral use of haloperidol and lorazepam in relation to patient participation in the HELP program. Sample The sample will consist of patients aged 70 years and older admitted to one of three medical-surgical units over a four-month period (N = 1117) at a community hospital.    Results The results will report differences in psychoactive medication use among patients enrolled or not enrolled in the HELP program. Potential confounding variables will be reported.   Conclusions Implications for ongoing evaluation of patient outcomes will be described. Detection of differences in delirium between enrolled and non-enrolled patients may be compounded by referral to the HELP program after delirium onset.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMonitoring Delirium in the Hospitalized Elderlyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156253-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Monitoring Delirium in the Hospitalized Elderly</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sandhaus, Sonia, MS, RN, CRNP</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Moses Taylor Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Nurse Practitioner</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">ssandhaus@mth.org</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Margarete Lieb Zalon, PhD, RN, APRN, BC; Faith Harrell, ; Donna Valenti, RNC</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background Delirium is a complex problem in the hospitalized elderly that is associated with increased mortality. Research has demonstrated that a program using volunteers, the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP), is effective in reducing the incidence of delirium in the hospitalized elderly (Inouye, et al., 1999). &nbsp;The translation of research findings by implementing a HELP program presents a challenge for community hospitals with limited resources.&nbsp; Furthermore, once such a program is started, it is difficult to determine which outcomes might be directly associated with the intervention. The purpose is to illustrate the evaluation of health outcomes when monitoring the hospitalized elderly for delirium. Specifically, a marker for delirium, intravenous haloperidol and lorazepam use, in relation to patient enrollment in the HELP program will be used to illustrate the complexities of systematic outcome evaluation. Procedures Patients aged 70 years and older are enrolled into the HELP program upon nurse or physician request.&nbsp; The HELP program consists of skilled interdisciplinary staff with geriatric expertise and trained volunteers who carry out interventions addressing special needs of older adults. Volunteers perform therapeutic activities which include communication/comfort, relaxation, meal assistance and recreation. This will be a retrospective analysis of&nbsp;parenteral use of haloperidol and lorazepam in relation to patient participation in the HELP program. Sample The sample will consist of patients aged 70 years and older admitted to one of three medical-surgical units over a four-month period (N = 1117) at a community hospital. &nbsp;&nbsp; Results The results will report differences in psychoactive medication use among patients enrolled or not enrolled in the HELP program. Potential confounding variables will be reported. &nbsp; Conclusions Implications for ongoing evaluation of patient outcomes will be described.&nbsp;Detection of differences in delirium between enrolled and non-enrolled patients may be compounded by referral to the HELP program after delirium onset.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:36:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:36:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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