2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156261
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Recruitment of African American Women in Hypertension Genetic Studies
Abstract:
Recruitment of African American Women in Hypertension Genetic Studies
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Taylor, Jacquelyn, PhD, PNP, RN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Assistant Professor
Co-Authors:Kavya Vaidyanathan,
Background: Hypertension is a common cardiovascular condition primarily among the African American population. Many studies have asserted that single nucleotide polymorphisms contribute to an increased risk of hypertension. African Americans have been identified to have certain polymorphisms for hypertension susceptibility. Purpose:  A key to any study is successful recruitment. The purpose of this report is to examine the most effective mechanism by which multiple generations of African American women are successfully recruited into a high blood pressure genetics study.  Methods: These methods and sites included 1) use of a gerontology participant resource pool, 2) posting of flyers at a large university campus, 3) circulation of flyers at a historically black sorority, 4) recruitment via a mobile pediatric practice, and 5) use of close social networks of family and friends. Results: We have successfully recruited 57 participants at this point. Thirty-six participants (63%) were recruited via close social networks of family friends. Approximately 15.8% were recruited from the historically black sorority, another 15.8% from individuals responding to flyers posted on the university campus and only 5.4% were obtained from the participant resource pool. No participants were recruited from the mobile pediatric practice. Implications: Although there have been some challenges in the past with obtaining entry and trust within the African American community for conducting healthcare related research it is important to investigate new and innovative methods for securing these samples. Alternatives to recruitment via the following yielded the best results in enrollment of three generations of African American women into a hypertension genetics study: 1) close social networks of family, friends, 2) historically black sorority and 3) use of flyer advertisement on a large university campus. Use of these methods may aid other researchers who seek to examine African American samples of multiple generations, women and genetic predisposition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRecruitment of African American Women in Hypertension Genetic Studiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156261-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Recruitment of African American Women in Hypertension Genetic Studies</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Taylor, Jacquelyn, PhD, PNP, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jytaylor@umich.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Kavya Vaidyanathan,</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Background: Hypertension is a common cardiovascular condition primarily among the African American population. Many studies have asserted that single nucleotide polymorphisms contribute to an increased risk of hypertension. African Americans have been identified to have certain polymorphisms for hypertension susceptibility. Purpose:&nbsp;&nbsp;A key to any study is successful recruitment. The purpose of this report is to examine the most effective mechanism by which multiple generations of African American women are successfully recruited into a high blood pressure genetics study.&nbsp; Methods: These methods and sites included 1) use of a gerontology participant resource pool, 2) posting of flyers at a large university campus, 3) circulation of flyers at a historically black sorority, 4) recruitment via a mobile pediatric practice, and 5) use of close social networks of family and friends. Results: We have successfully recruited 57 participants at this point. Thirty-six participants (63%) were recruited via close social networks of family friends. Approximately 15.8% were recruited from the historically black sorority, another 15.8% from individuals responding to flyers posted on the university campus and only 5.4% were obtained from the participant resource pool. No participants were recruited from the mobile pediatric practice. Implications: Although there have been some challenges in the past with obtaining entry and trust within the African American community for conducting healthcare related research it is important to investigate new and innovative methods for securing these samples. Alternatives to recruitment via the following yielded the best results in enrollment of three generations of African American women into a hypertension genetics study: 1) close social networks of family, friends, 2) historically black sorority and 3) use of flyer advertisement on a large university campus. Use of these methods may aid other researchers who seek to examine African American samples of multiple generations, women and genetic predisposition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:36:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:36:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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