Study Abroad Experiences for Nursing Students in U.S. Undergraduate and Graduate Programs

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156263
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Study Abroad Experiences for Nursing Students in U.S. Undergraduate and Graduate Programs
Abstract:
Study Abroad Experiences for Nursing Students in U.S. Undergraduate and Graduate Programs
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Thompson, Mary Ann, RN, DrPH
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University Southeast
Title:Adjunct Professor
Co-Authors:Esther P. Haloburdo, RN, PhD
Nursing's accrediting bodies call for the inclusion of global health perspectives in all nursing education in the United States (AACN, 1998; NLN, 2004). One method for meeting this goal is study abroad. Little is known about how many nursing programs actually provide international study and how many students participate. The last comprehensive survey of study abroad in nursing programs was conducted in 1984 (Lindquist, 1986). A smaller survey was conducted in 1995 (Wright, et. al, 1998). Purpose: The purpose was to describe the status of study abroad opportunities for undergraduate and graduate nursing students in U.S. colleges and universities, and to determine if study abroad opportunities for nursing students had changed in twenty years. Method: Descriptive, quantitative design. The questionnaire consisted of 16 items, designed by the investigators, reflective of questions included in Lindquist's (1986) original survey. Six hundred seventy-nine (679) surveys were mailed to all AACN member and non-member schools in the continental United States. Completed surveys were returned by 437 schools, for a response rate of 65%. Findings: Approximately 1/3 of U.S. nursing programs report some type of study abroad opportunity. An additional 30% of schools have future plans for a program. The majority of schools offer short-term (2 to 4 weeks) study abroad options for fewer than 20 students per year. Ninety-six different countries, both developed and less developed, are utilized. The content focus, planning, financing, and evaluation of the programs are described. Faculty issues and financing pose barriers to study abroad. Conclusions: The number and types of study abroad experiences for nursing students has increased over the last 20 years. Programs have begun to recognize the value of such experiences for internationalizing the curriculum and for the personal and professional growth of students.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStudy Abroad Experiences for Nursing Students in U.S. Undergraduate and Graduate Programsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156263-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Study Abroad Experiences for Nursing Students in U.S. Undergraduate and Graduate Programs</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Thompson, Mary Ann, RN, DrPH</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University Southeast</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Adjunct Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mat5@columbia.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Esther P. Haloburdo, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Nursing's accrediting bodies call for the inclusion of global health perspectives in all nursing education in the United States (AACN, 1998; NLN, 2004). One method for meeting this goal is study abroad. Little is known about how many nursing programs actually provide international study and how many students participate. The last comprehensive survey of study abroad in nursing programs was conducted in 1984 (Lindquist, 1986). A smaller survey was conducted in 1995 (Wright, et. al, 1998). Purpose: The purpose was to describe the status of study abroad opportunities for undergraduate and graduate nursing students in U.S. colleges and universities, and to determine if study abroad opportunities for nursing students had changed in twenty years. Method: Descriptive, quantitative design. The questionnaire consisted of 16 items, designed by the investigators, reflective of questions included in Lindquist's (1986) original survey. Six hundred seventy-nine (679) surveys were mailed to all AACN member and non-member schools in the continental United States. Completed surveys were returned by 437 schools, for a response rate of 65%. Findings: Approximately 1/3 of U.S. nursing programs report some type of study abroad opportunity. An additional 30% of schools have future plans for a program. The majority of schools offer short-term (2 to 4 weeks) study abroad options for fewer than 20 students per year. Ninety-six different countries, both developed and less developed, are utilized. The content focus, planning, financing, and evaluation of the programs are described. Faculty issues and financing pose barriers to study abroad. Conclusions: The number and types of study abroad experiences for nursing students has increased over the last 20 years. Programs have begun to recognize the value of such experiences for internationalizing the curriculum and for the personal and professional growth of students.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:36:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:36:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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