2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156266
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physical Activity in Anglo, Black and Hispanic Employed Women
Abstract:
Physical Activity in Anglo, Black and Hispanic Employed Women
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Tsai, Hsiu-Min, PhD, RN
P.I. Institution Name:Chang Gung Institute of Technology/Nursing
Title:Associate Professor, Dean of Academic Affair
Co-Authors:Hsing-Mei Chen, MSN, RN; Shirly Laffrey, PhD, MPH, RN, CS; Jimmy M. Blanton, MPAFF, MA; Weihua Li, MPH, MD
Purpose: The main two purposes of thee study are to describe the perceived personal and environmental barriers related to physically active in African American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic White (NHW) employed women, and to investigate the relationship of demographic variables, barriers, and work-place support to the women?s moderate and vigorous physical activity. Method: This study was a secondary analysis of the 2003 Texas BRFSS data conducted by the Texas Department of Health, Texas, U.S. The dependent variables were moderate and vigorous physical activity. The independent variables were ethnicity/race, age, education, marital status, annual household income, perceived personal barriers, perceived environmental barriers, and work-place support. Sample: The participants consisted of 1,862 employed women aged 18 and older who were surveyed in the 2003 Texas BRFSS, and who identified themselves as Black, Hispanic, or Non-Hispanic White. Finding: Results show that participation in moderate activities was lower for the Hispanic and Black women than for the NHW women. The most frequently reported personal barrier for the Hispanic and NHW women was ?lack of time?. For the Black women, ?too tired? was most commonly reported personal barrier. The most frequently reported environmental barrier to physical activity for all three groups was ?lack of adequate facilities?. The most frequently reported work-place barriers were that they usually ate during breaks. Workplace support was a significant predictor of moderate activity among both the Hispanic and NHW women. Age was the most significant predictor of vigorous activity for NHW women, whereas work-place support significantly predicted vigorous activity in the Black women. Conclusion: Non-participation rates in physical activity among the Black and Hispanic women were higher than NHW. Also, key differences indicated the need to tailor interventions to each group?s unique needs for increasing the engagement in physical activity among minority employed women in Texas.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysical Activity in Anglo, Black and Hispanic Employed Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156266-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Physical Activity in Anglo, Black and Hispanic Employed Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tsai, Hsiu-Min, PhD, RN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Chang Gung Institute of Technology/Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor, Dean of Academic Affair</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hmtsai@mail.cgit.edu.tw</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Hsing-Mei Chen, MSN, RN; Shirly Laffrey, PhD, MPH, RN, CS; Jimmy M. Blanton, MPAFF, MA; Weihua Li, MPH, MD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The main two purposes of thee study are to describe the perceived personal and environmental barriers related to physically active in African American, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic White (NHW) employed women, and to investigate the relationship of demographic variables, barriers, and work-place support to the women?s moderate and vigorous physical activity. Method: This study was a secondary analysis of the 2003 Texas BRFSS data conducted by the Texas Department of Health, Texas, U.S. The dependent variables were moderate and vigorous physical activity. The independent variables were ethnicity/race, age, education, marital status, annual household income, perceived personal barriers, perceived environmental barriers, and work-place support. Sample: The participants consisted of 1,862 employed women aged 18 and older who were surveyed in the 2003 Texas BRFSS, and who identified themselves as Black, Hispanic, or Non-Hispanic White. Finding: Results show that participation in moderate activities was lower for the Hispanic and Black women than for the NHW women. The most frequently reported personal barrier for the Hispanic and NHW women was ?lack of time?. For the Black women, ?too tired? was most commonly reported personal barrier. The most frequently reported environmental barrier to physical activity for all three groups was ?lack of adequate facilities?. The most frequently reported work-place barriers were that they usually ate during breaks. Workplace support was a significant predictor of moderate activity among both the Hispanic and NHW women. Age was the most significant predictor of vigorous activity for NHW women, whereas work-place support significantly predicted vigorous activity in the Black women. Conclusion: Non-participation rates in physical activity among the Black and Hispanic women were higher than NHW. Also, key differences indicated the need to tailor interventions to each group?s unique needs for increasing the engagement in physical activity among minority employed women in Texas.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:36:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:36:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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