The Need for International Ejection Prevention Standards/Programs Based on Injury/Fatality Data and Successful Ejection Prevention Programs Adopted in the United States of America

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/156270
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Need for International Ejection Prevention Standards/Programs Based on Injury/Fatality Data and Successful Ejection Prevention Programs Adopted in the United States of America
Abstract:
The Need for International Ejection Prevention Standards/Programs Based on Injury/Fatality Data and Successful Ejection Prevention Programs Adopted in the United States of America
Conference Sponsor:Sigma Theta Tau International
Conference Year:2006
Author:Williams, Andrea L., RN, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin Hospital & Clinics, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Title:Trauma Program Manager, Associate Clinical Professor
Co-Authors:Patricia D. Padjen, RN, PhD
The World Health Organization predicts that by the year 2020 motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) will move from 9th to 6th in the ranking as a cause of death, second in years of life lost and third in disability-adjusted years.  Although statistics on ?road crash? deaths are available through data bases such as the International Road Traffic & Accident Database (OECD); the Multi-Country Statistical Road Crash Database; US National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA), World Heath Organization, Global Road Safety Partnership (GRSP) through the World Bank, International Road Federation (IRF), regional and country specific databases; and TRL Publications; ejection data is limited. Each year in the US approximately 52,900 ejections occur. Thirty-two percent, (10,300) result in fatality (Wilke, 2003).  Ejection is one of the most injurious events that can happen to a person in a MVC. Findings from fatal crashes in 2002 documented that 73 percent of passenger vehicle occupants were killed, if they were totally ejected from the vehicle.  Safety belts are effective in preventing total ejections: Only 1 percent of the occupants reported to have been using restraints were totally ejected, compared with 30 percent in unrestrained occupants (NHTSA Traffic Safety Facts, 2002). Injury prevention programs focus on promoting seat belt use through mandatory seat belt legislation, seat belt reminder alarms, and sTEPS (Selective Traffic Enforcement Programs in Canada, Europe, & the US), a combination of seat belt enforcement and simultaneous mass media campaign. Needless deaths and skyrocketing health care costs occur as a result of MVCs with ejection. Yet, as motor vehicle use and miles driven increases worldwide, ejection statistics are limited in the US and unavailable in many countries of the world. The purpose of this investigation was to define the scope of ejection data internationally, identify ejection prevention efforts, and propose an international ejection prevention program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Sigma Theta Tau International

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Need for International Ejection Prevention Standards/Programs Based on Injury/Fatality Data and Successful Ejection Prevention Programs Adopted in the United States of Americaen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/156270-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Need for International Ejection Prevention Standards/Programs Based on Injury/Fatality Data and Successful Ejection Prevention Programs Adopted in the United States of America</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Sigma Theta Tau International</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2006</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Andrea L., RN, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin Hospital &amp; Clinics, University of Wisconsin, Madison</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Trauma Program Manager, Associate Clinical Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">al.williams@hosp.wisc.edu</td></tr><tr class="item-co-authors"><td class="label">Co-Authors:</td><td class="value">Patricia D. Padjen, RN, PhD</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The World Health Organization predicts that by the year 2020 motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) will move from 9th to 6th in the ranking as a cause of death, second in years of life lost and third in disability-adjusted years.&nbsp; Although statistics on ?road crash? deaths are available through data bases such as the International Road Traffic &amp; Accident Database (OECD); the Multi-Country Statistical Road Crash Database; US National Highway Safety Administration (NHTSA), World Heath Organization, Global Road Safety Partnership (GRSP) through the World Bank, International Road Federation (IRF), regional and country specific databases; and TRL Publications; ejection data is limited. Each year in the US approximately 52,900 ejections occur.&nbsp;Thirty-two percent, (10,300) result in fatality (Wilke, 2003). &nbsp;Ejection is one of the most injurious events that can happen to a person in a MVC.&nbsp;Findings from fatal crashes in 2002 documented that 73 percent of passenger vehicle occupants were killed, if they were totally ejected from the vehicle.&nbsp; Safety belts are effective in preventing total ejections:&nbsp;Only 1 percent of the occupants reported to have been using restraints were totally ejected, compared with 30 percent in unrestrained occupants (NHTSA Traffic Safety Facts, 2002). Injury prevention programs focus on promoting seat belt use through mandatory seat belt legislation, seat belt reminder alarms, and sTEPS (Selective Traffic Enforcement Programs in Canada, Europe, &amp; the US), a combination of seat belt enforcement and simultaneous mass media campaign. Needless deaths and skyrocketing health care costs occur as a result of&nbsp;MVCs with ejection. Yet, as motor vehicle use and miles driven increases worldwide, ejection statistics are limited in the US and unavailable in many countries of the world. The purpose of this investigation was to define the scope of ejection data internationally, identify ejection prevention efforts, and propose an international ejection prevention program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T14:37:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T14:37:10Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipSigma Theta Tau Internationalen_GB
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